Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Hello I have the following code, which I compile with gcc (>4.2) with -fopenmp flag:

int main(void)
{
#pragma omp parallel for
    int i; 
    for(i=0;i<4;i++) while(1);

    return 0;
}

I get a SIGSEGV on OSX Lion (ver 1.7.3, llvm-gcc 4.2.1) and CentOS 6.2 . What am I doing wrong here? Thanks

share|improve this question
    
I get the same, Win7/cygwin, gcc 4.5.0. I ran it though gdb: it creates the threads and then I get Program received signal SIGSEGV, Segmentation fault. 0x63602726 in omp_get_max_active_levels (). It runs fine without the while(1). How is OpenMP treating that infinite loop? –  Steve Blackwell Feb 6 '12 at 16:37
    
You're using an undeclared variable. But that should generate a compilation error, not a segfault. But with i declared I also get a segfault, gcc-4.5.1, openSuSE 11.4. –  Daniel Fischer Feb 6 '12 at 16:41
    
I forgot to add.. int i.. I wrote the code in a hurry :D. –  sfa Feb 6 '12 at 20:58

3 Answers 3

Not sure if this is relevant to the compiler version and configuration but while(true){} terminates

More precisely, if you write a loop which

  • makes no calls to library I/O functions, and
  • does not access or modify volatile objects, and
  • performs no synchronization operations (1.10) or atomic operations (Clause 29)

and does not terminate, you have undefined behaviour.

This may end up not applying to your situation, but as C++11 becomes more established, watch out.

share|improve this answer
    
Irrelevant, this is C, and in C, the loop may only be assumed to terminate if the controlling expression is not a constant expression. Since while(1); is controlled by a constant expression, the loop must not terminate. –  Daniel Fischer Feb 6 '12 at 19:56
    
Interesting, I didn't realise C had a not-constant-expression quality like that. Can you point to the standard, please? –  spraff Feb 7 '12 at 8:32
    
Hello spraff, I don't see any undefined behavior in C => while(1); (point to the C standard please). It should be an unconditional jump (jmp) jumping at its own address. If I create 4 threads (with pthread_create) and I put in the start function a "while(1);" I get no SIGSEGV, and my 4 cores are at 100%. I wanted to achieve the same behavior with openmp, but it seems it's not that reliable as I thought. –  sfa Feb 7 '12 at 9:35
2  
I'm going by n1570 since I don't have the actual standard, in 6.8.5 (6): "An iteration statement whose controlling expression is not a constant expression,that performs no input/output operations, ...". It's possible that the 'not a constant expression' qualifier has been removed again, but since it has been added later to the paragraph, I don't expect that. –  Daniel Fischer Feb 7 '12 at 10:10

Very interesting.

I changed the code a little so

int main(void)
{
int i;
#pragma omp parallel 
  {
        while(1);
    }
    return 0;
} 

and so

inline void func() {
    while (1) ;
}

int main(void)
{
int i;
#pragma omp parallel for 
    for(i=0;i<8;i++) {
        func();
    }
    return 0;
}

And they both worked OK.

share|improve this answer
    
I know, I also tried the latter. (also works without the inline). But what do you think is wrong with the code I wrote,(except that is missing a... int i). On my CentOS gomp_loop_static_start() gets called, with parameters like => chunk_size=140737488347560, istart=0x7fffffffe1b0, iend=0xca. The last one is a pointer which gets dereferenced.. hence getting the SIGSEGV. If I explicitly use schedule() to set chunk size to a value, the iend pointer is a valid address.. and I get no SIG 11. Also if I debug your latter code(with the inline fnc) gomp_loop_static_start() doesn't get called at all. –  sfa Feb 6 '12 at 21:33
    
if you compile with optimizations enabled then you also get segfault for func() case. –  J.F. Sebastian Feb 6 '12 at 23:14
    
@J.F.Sebastian Not here, with func(), it properly does nothing at 390+% CPU, from -O0 to -O3 and -Os. Segfaults with an unadorned while(1); on all optimisation levels. gcc is 4.5.1. Very strange. –  Daniel Fischer Feb 7 '12 at 0:18
    
gcc 4.6.1: -O0 no segfault, -O1+ -- segfault. –  J.F. Sebastian Feb 7 '12 at 0:57
    
@sfa, I really don't know what happens. Think one should look at the generated assembler code. Latter i will try to use Intel C++ compiler, now i have no time. –  mikithskegg Feb 7 '12 at 11:06
up vote 1 down vote accepted

There was a bug in the gcc regarding this issue, I reported it and they will provide a fix. Here is the link: GCC bug

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.