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for(int i=0;i<10;i++) { 
    System.out.println(i);
}

In this simple for loop, we initialize i at zero and increment it in every turn. But if we have already increment i, why is my output starting at 0. Didn't it has to be 0? There is one more indication of that

for(int i=0;i<10;) { 
    i++;
    System.out.println(i);
}

They're both for loop but why are outputs different?

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Combine the 2 below answers, and you get the correct answer :) –  Adel Boutros Feb 6 '12 at 16:13
    
They're both for loop but why are outputs different? because they are not the same thing. If you step through the code in a debugger you will see exactly what each line does. –  Peter Lawrey Feb 6 '12 at 16:22

7 Answers 7

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Probably because

for(int i=0;i<10;i++) { 
    System.out.println(i);
}

is equivalent to:

for(int i=0;i<10;) { 
    System.out.println(i);
    i++;
}
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In:

 for(int i=0;i<10;i++) { 

the i++ is executed after each iteration, not before.

In other words, this loop is equivalent to:

int i = 0;
while (i < 10) {
    System.out.println(i);
    i++;
}

Notice that the i++ happens after the println() and not before.

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The way a for-loop looks is like this:

for (initializer; condition; increment)
    statements;

It is executed like this:

initializer;
while (condition)
{
   statements
   increment
}

So, the increment only happens AFTER statements is executed.

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The reason it starts at one in your code, is that you are telling it to increment before you use: System.out.println(i);

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The outputs are different because the iteration step of the for loop (the third field) happens after the execution of the code.

This is the equivalent statement to the first for loop:

for(int i=0;i<10;) { 
    System.out.println(i);
    i++;
}
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in the first one, i++ is executed at the end of the loop. That is after the loop block has completed. ITs like the compiler adds i++ to the end of the loop body. So initially the value of i is 0 and incremented at the end of loop. In second case, you are incrementing it manually at the begining of the loop

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First for argument is an initialization; it evaluates once before each entire operation. The second argument is a condition. It executed BEFORE each one single cycle and a loop continues ONLY if it is true. The third for argument is iteration and it evaluates AFTER EACH cycle, including last one.

Last rule makes it possible to put loops in chain. You should remove int definition from for then and define loop variable somewhere outside.

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/nutsandbolts/for.html

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