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I'm searching a way to reduce the following piece of code to a single regexp statement:

if( $current_value =~ /(\d+)(MB)*/ ){
        $current_value = $1 * 1024 * 1024;
    }
    elsif( $current_value =~ /(\d+)(GB)*/ ){
        $current_value = $1 * 1024 * 1024 * 1024;
    }
    elsif( $current_value =~ /(\d+)(KB)*/ ){
        $current_value = $1 * 1024;
    }

The code performs an evaluation of the value that can be expressed as a single number (bytes), a number and KB (kilobytes), with megabytes (MB) and so on. Any idea on how to reduce the block code?

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2  
First of all, your code won't work as it is. You put the * after each statement, so the KB|MB|GB part is optional (0 or more). Are you sure that is what you want? –  Konerak Feb 6 '12 at 16:42

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could set up a hash like this:

my %FACTORS = ( 'KB' => 1024, 'MB' => 1024**2, 'GB' => 1024**3 );

And then parse the text like this:

if ( $current_value =~ /(\d+)(KB|MB|GB)/ ) {
    $current_value = $1 * $FACTORS{$2};
}

In your example the regex has a * which I'm not sure you intend, because * means "zero or more" and so (+\d)(MB)* would match 10 or 10MB or 10MBMB or 10MBMBMBMBMBMBMB.

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I would drop the empty string match; that won't work... but +1 for the hash lookup! –  pavel Feb 6 '12 at 16:44
    
The idea is sound, but your hash keys are K/M/G, your captures are KB/MB/GB - your code won't find the items in the hash. –  Konerak Feb 6 '12 at 16:49
1  
([KMG]B) is even fancier, albeit not as readable. –  TLP Feb 6 '12 at 17:02
2  
Also, 1024*1024*1024 = 1024**3. –  TLP Feb 6 '12 at 17:07
    
@Konerak Thanks for the fix, I edited the code after posting and didn't run the unit tests. :-) –  benzado Feb 6 '12 at 22:48

Number::Format

use warnings;
use strict;

use Number::Format qw(format_bytes);
print format_bytes(1024), "\n";
print format_bytes(2535116549), "\n";

__END__

1K
2.36G
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1  
Yup, this module appears to do the job. unformat_number("4K", base => 1024) yields 4096. –  Konerak Feb 6 '12 at 18:44

Using benzado's modified code, here is a test you can run to see if it works.

We advise you to always put code like this in a reusable method, and write a small unit-test for it:

use Test::More;

plan tests => 4;

##
# Convert a string denoting '50MB' into an amount in bytes.
my %FACTORS = ( 'KB' => 1024, 'MB' => 1024*1024, 'GB' => 1024*1024*1024 );
sub string_to_bytes {
        my $current_value = shift;

        if ( $current_value =~ /(\d+)(KB|MB|GB)/ ) {
            $current_value = $1 * $FACTORS{$2};
        }
        return $current_value;
}

my $tests = {
        '50' => 50,
        '52KB' => 52*1024,
        '55MB' => 55*1024*1024,
        '57GB' => 57*1024*1024*1024
};

foreach(keys %$tests) {
        is( string_to_bytes($_),$tests->{$_},
            "Testing if $_ becomes $tests->{$_}");
}

Running this gives:

$ perl testz.pl
1..4
ok 1 - Testing if 55MB becomes 57671680
ok 2 - Testing if 50 becomes 50
ok 3 - Testing if 52KB becomes 53248
ok 4 - Testing if 57GB becomes 61203283968

Now you can

  • Add more testcases (what happens with BIG numbers? What do you want to happen? What for undef, for strings, when kB is written with small k, when you encounter kibiB or kiB or Kb?)
  • Turn this into a module
  • Write documentation in POD
  • Upload the Module to CPAN

And voilá!

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CPAN already has some offerings: Number::Format and Format::Human::Bytes –  toolic Feb 6 '12 at 17:08
    
Excellent! You can keep the entire batch of tests, but just replace the call for the string_to_bytes function with the appriopriate call to the module. Now you can see if the module does what you want it to do. –  Konerak Feb 6 '12 at 19:55

You can do it in one regexp, by putting code snippits inside the regexp to handle the three cases differently

my $r;

$current_value =~ s/
    (\d+)(?:
          Ki (?{ $r = $^N * 1024 })
        | Mi (?{ $r = $^N * 1024 * 1024 })
        | Gi (?{ $r = $^N * 1024 * 1024 * 1024 })
    )/$r/xso;
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I like that you used Ki instead of the KB. Especially since KB has meant both 1000 bytes, and 1024 bytes. ( MB is even worse, it has meant 1000 * 1000, 1024 * 1024, and 1000 * 1024 ) –  Brad Gilbert Feb 7 '12 at 0:30
    
Well the OP had it wrong two ways. First off the OP was converting KB to a (dimensionless) factor N. Now KB is not just a factor N, but a factor of a number of 'B' (presumably bytes), so they made a dimensional mismatch. Secondly the OP has K meaning 1024, which is "Eee, when I were a lad, men were men, and K was 1024, and that's how it should be" brain-damaged thinking. I happened to fix both issues in passing. @Brad_Gilbert: As an aside, you've magically changed B into b, which to me is questionable because in my mind B means bytes and b means bits... –  zgpmax Feb 7 '12 at 0:41
1  
Of course, one should really use a CPAN module such as Number::Format. Doing it in a single regex is more in the way of a Perl programming exercise. (A similar technique was demonstrated in a talk by Gianni Ceccarelli at the London Perl Mongers technical meeting 2012-01-26.) –  zgpmax Feb 7 '12 at 0:45
    
You really should have used (?{ local $r = .... (In this case it doesn't really matter.) –  Brad Gilbert Feb 7 '12 at 5:10

There is a problem with using KB for 1024 bytes. Kilo as a prefix generally means 1000 of a thing not 1024.

The problem gets even worse with MB since it has meant 1000*1000, 1024*1024, and 1000*1024.

A 1.44 MB floppy actually holds 1.44 * 1000 * 1024.

The only real way out of this is to use the new KiB (Kibibyte) to mean 1024 bytes.


The way you implemented it also has the limitation that you can't use 8.4Gi to mean 8.4 * 1024 * 1024. To remove that limitation I used $RE{num}{real} from Regexp::Common instead of \d+.


Some of the other answers hardwire the match by writing out all of the possible matches. That can get very tedious, not to mention error prone. To get around that I used the keys of %multiplier to generate the regex. This means that if you add or remove elements from %multiplier you won't have to modify the regex by hand.

use strict;
use warnings;
use Regexp::Common;

my %multiplier;
my $multiplier_match;
{

  # populate %multiplier
  my %exponent = (
    K => 1, # Kilo  Kibi
    M => 2, # Mega  Mebi 
    G => 3, # Giga  Gibi
    T => 4, # Tera  Tebi
    P => 5, # Peta  Pebi
    E => 6, # Exa   Exbi
    Z => 7, # Zetta Zebi
    Y => 8, # Yotta Yobi
  );
  while( my ($str,$exp) = each %exponent ){
    @multiplier{ $str,      "${str}B"  } = (1000 ** $exp) x2; # K  KB
    @multiplier{ "${str}i", "${str}iB" } = (1024 ** $exp) x2; # Ki KiB
  }
  # %multiplier now holds 32 pairs (8*4)

  # build $multiplier_match
  local $" #" # fix broken highlighting
    = '|';
  my @keys = keys %multiplier;
  $multiplier_match = qr(@keys);

}

sub remove_multiplier{
  die unless @_ == 1;
  local ($_) = @_;

  #  s/^($RE{num}{real})($multiplier_match)$/ $1 * $multiplier{$2} /e;
  if( /^($RE{num}{real})($multiplier_match)$/ ){
    return $1 * $multiplier{$2};
  }

  return $_;
}

If you absolutely need 1K to mean 1024 then you only need to change one line.

# @multiplier{ $str, "${str}B"  } = (1000 ** $exp) x2; # K  KB
  @multiplier{ $str, "${str}B"  } = (1024 ** $exp) x2; # K  KB

Note that since I used $RE{num}{real} from Regexp::Common it will also work with 5.3e1Ki.

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