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css

.item {
  display: none;
}

html

<div>
  <div class="item">machin</div>
  <div class="item">chose</div>
  <div class="item">chouette</div>
  <div class="item">prout</div>
</div>

I'm using jQuery and I'd like to make each .item appearing after a random little timer like:

javascript

$('.item').each(function () {
  itm = $(this);
  setTimeout(function () {
    itm.fadeIn(1000);
  }, Math.floor(Math.random() * 1000));
})

Here itm will always contain the last item because the function is evaluated after all assignments.
I can't use the 3rd parameter of setTimeout() because it will not work on IE.
It's not advised to use setTimeout() with the eval method for security reasons.

So how can I access to my object through setTimeout() ?


Edit

I know that this question have already been posted.
But I though that it were slightly specific with the each() context.
Now someone have entirely changed the title of my question that was originally something like 'setTimeout() - jQuery.each() this object parameter'

share|improve this question
    
this inside of setTimeout() refers to the global object. Your code above shouldn't even work for the last item. –  Kevin B Feb 6 '12 at 16:57
    
Sorry I was actually doing itm = $(this) in my code instead of var itm = $(this), I updated my question. Then now I don't know which answer to accept :) –  Pierre de LESPINAY Feb 6 '12 at 17:21
3  
@PierredeLESPINAY Aha. The difference between var itm and itm is that without var it is a single global variable, instead of a local variable for each call of the enclosing function. That's why the setTimeout only ever saw the last element in the list. –  Izkata Feb 6 '12 at 18:59
    
That was actually the problem –  Pierre de LESPINAY Feb 7 '12 at 7:50
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8 Answers

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Do not use setTimeout, use jQuery own tools.

$('.item').each(function () {
   $(this).delay(Math.random() * 1000).fadeIn();
})

http://api.jquery.com/delay/

Working example: http://jsfiddle.net/qENhd/

share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't work. –  ShankarSangoli Feb 6 '12 at 17:02
    
@ShankarSangoli: sure it does. –  thg435 Feb 6 '12 at 17:05
    
If you notice the div's don't fadeIn in sequence as it should be. –  ShankarSangoli Feb 6 '12 at 17:07
    
@ShankarSangoli I don't see any reason that it wouldn't work. Remember, this isn't a for-loop, therefore it doesn't have the same issues. –  Kevin B Feb 6 '12 at 17:08
1  
@ShankarSangoli: this is not a requirement, at least, the original code doesn't do that. –  thg435 Feb 6 '12 at 17:10
show 1 more comment

Create/Utilize a closure:

$('.item').each(function () {
  var that = this;

  setTimeout(function () {
    $(that).fadeIn(1000);
  }, Math.floor(Math.random() * 1000));
})

http://jibbering.com/faq/notes/closures/

https://developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Guide/Closures

share|improve this answer
    
Since the OP can't get JQuery's built-in tools to work, this is by far the simplest and most straightforward –  Izkata Feb 6 '12 at 17:39
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Before setTimeout executes each loop would have finished executing, it will not wait. Also inside setTimeout function this will not refer to the DOM element.

Try something like this.

function fadeItem(item){
   item.fadeIn(1000);
}

$('.item').each(function () {
  var $item = $(this);
  setTimeout(function () {
    fadeItem($item);
  }, Math.floor(Math.random() * 1000));
});

You can also try something like this.

var $items = $('.item'), count = 0;

function fadeItem(item){
   item.fadeIn(1000);
    if(count < $items.length){
       setTimeout(function(){
            fadeItem($items.eq(count++));
       }, Math.floor(Math.random() * 1000));
    }
}
setTimeout(function(){
    fadeItem($items.eq(count++));
}, Math.floor(Math.random() * 1000));
share|improve this answer
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You need to store this in a separate variable:

$('.item').each(function () {
  var me = $(this);
  setTimeout(function () {
    me.fadeIn(1000);
  }, Math.floor(Math.random() * 1000));
})
share|improve this answer
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The trick here is to save this into a local that can be evaluated safely in the setTimeout callback

$('.item').each(function () {
  var self = this;
  setTimeout(function () {
    $(self).fadeIn(1000);
  }, Math.floor(Math.random() * 1000));
});
share|improve this answer
add comment

Try this:

$('.item').each(function () {
 var myVar = $(this);
setTimeout(function () {
myVar.fadeIn(1000);
}, Math.floor(Math.random() * 1000));
})
share|improve this answer
add comment

Try this insteed:

    $('.item').each(function () {
        var elm = this;
      setTimeout(function () {
        $(elm).fadeIn(1000);
      }, Math.floor(Math.random() * 1000));
    })

I can't explain why it works, but i think this is a reference to another "this" in your setTimeout.

http://jsfiddle.net/Pdrfz/

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add comment

Try this:

 $('.item').each(function () {
    var item =$(this);
    setTimeout(function () {
            item.fadeIn(1000);
        },
        Math.floor(Math.random() * 1000));
   });
share|improve this answer
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