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I have defined some functions (no classes involved here) in an external *.cpp file, and of course there is an appropriate *.h file.

Some of the functions in the *.cpp file are used only in that *.cpp file nowhere else. They are not even mentioned in the *.h file.

Should I put those functions into an unnamed namespace or may they live just next to the other functions? And if so, why should I need an unnamed namespace for them? I cannot see a problem, since those functions are not accessible from outside anyway.

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Why not just make them static? (as in a static C function, not a static class method) –  James McLaughlin Feb 6 '12 at 17:41
    
@JamesMcLaughlin: Well in C++03 static was deprecated for that purpose. However, C++11 un-deprecates it. But static and being in the unnamed namespace mean different things. static will give it internal linkage, so the function can't be used for some purposes. –  Fred Larson Feb 6 '12 at 17:45
    
Thanks for your suggestions. Is any of those solutions, static or unanmed namespace, recommended or preferred? –  user1192880 Feb 6 '12 at 17:49
    
@FredLarson The only reason it was un-deprecated in C++11 was because the committee felt that it wasn't realistic to get people to stop using it, not because they changed their minds about its use. –  David Stone Jun 17 '12 at 19:40

3 Answers 3

If you want them to be truly private to that compilation unit, put them in an anonymous namespace. If you don't then someone could declare those functions elsewhere and use them explicitly.

Take the following example:

// library.cpp

// a "private" function here, in that it is not declared anywhere
void f() {}

namespace
{
   // same as above, except within an anonymous namespace
   void g() {}
}

// client.cpp

void f();

int main()
{
   // Can call f(), it's been declared and is now effectively "public"
   f();

   // compilation error, this has no idea what g() is, it's not declared 
   // in any scope that can be resolved here
   g();

   return 0;
}
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Thank you! I was not aware of that "feature". –  user1192880 Feb 6 '12 at 17:50
    
This is what static is for. Anonymous namespaces provide this feature for classes and structs. –  Clark Gaebel Feb 6 '12 at 18:01
    
Does the static keyword also protect against name collision with other functions that may exist in other parts of the code? The unnamed namespace will. –  Chad Feb 6 '12 at 19:09

I guess if you don't want these functions to be seen from outside declare them as static.

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Your question can be split in two:

1. "How can I hide global functions ?"

One simple way to do that, is NOT to put the header of the function into the header file:

//============================
// Filename: "mylibrary.hpp"
//============================
// Description:
// Utility functions.
//============================
#ifndef MYLIBRARY_H_INCLUDED
#define MYLIBRARY_H_INCLUDED
//============================

namespace MyLibrary
{
    void DoSomething();
} // namespace MyLibrary

//============================
#endif // MYLIBRARY_H_INCLUDED
//============================

Full code file:

//============================
// Filename: "mylibrary.cpp"
//============================
// Description:
// Utility functions.
//============================
// self header include
#include "mylibrary.hpp"
//============================

namespace MyLibrary
{
    void DoSomethingBefore()
    {
      // ...
    }

    void DoSomethingAfter()
    {
      // ...
    }

    void DoSomethingConfirmed()
    {
      // ...
    }

    void DoSomething()
    {
      DoSomethingBefore();
      DoSomethingConfirmed();
      DoSomethingAfter();
    }
} // namespace MyLibrary

//============================
#endif // MYLIBRARY_H_INCLUDED
//============================

When this is compiled, you get a "mylibrary.o" or "mylibrary.obj" file. You may provide it, to other developers as: "mylibrary.hpp" plus "mylibrary.obj", but, without the "mylibrary.cpp" file. Most "plain c" / "c++" compilers can work this way.

2. "Are anonymous namespaces, a good technique to hide global functions ?"

There is a similar question on:

Unnamed/anonymous namespaces vs. static functions

But, personally, I don't like the "favorite" answer.

Namespaces are one of those things that wish existed since the start of "pure c" or "c++". But, "anonymous namespaces" or "unnamed namespaces", seems weird to use.

Its like trying to hide something, and, later, forget, where do you store it.

3 Additional suggestions

(a) I suggest to use a single main REQUIRED, not optional, non-anonymous namespace per file, with additional secondary inner namespaces. The main namespaces, should be the same id. as the filename, but, without the file extension or file suffix.

(b) Avoid anonymous namespaces. Its like storing things in a warehouse, without an index.

(c) Use a file extension, or file prefix, in your header files, maybe "*.h", even if if its a c++ file. The standard says c++ shouldn't use an file extension or file suffix on "c++" files, but are difficult to identify or find on the filesystem.

Good Luck.

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