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Im building a sample application where my types hierarchy isnt working with types ordering in Visual Studio. No matter what way i try to arrange the files ( up , down ) I cannot get all the classes be defined.

So in the order they are in f# project

type Artist() =
    let mutable artistId = 0
    let mutable name = String.Empty

    member x.ArtistId 
        with get() = artistId
        and set (value) = artistId <- value

    member x.Name
        with get() = name
        and set ( value ) = name <- value

type Genre() =
    let mutable name = String.Empty
    let mutable genreId = 0
    let mutable description = String.Empty
    let mutable albums = [new Album()]

    member x.Name 
        with get() = name
        and set (value) = name <- value

    member x.GenreId
        with get() = genreId
        and set ( value ) = genreId <- value

    member x.Description
        with get() = description
        and set ( value ) = description <- value

    member x.Albums
        with get() = albums
        and set ( value ) = albums <- value

and Album() =
    let mutable title = String.Empty
    let mutable genre = new Genre()
    let mutable albumId = 0
    let mutable genreId = 0
    let mutable artistId = 0
    let mutable price : decimal = Decimal.Zero
    let mutable albumArtUrl = String.Empty
    let mutable artist = new Artist()

    member x.Title
        with get() = title
        and set (value) = title <- value

    member x.Genre
        with get() = genre
        and set (value) = genre <- value

    member x.AlbumId
        with get() = albumId
        and set ( value ) = albumId <- value

    member x.GenreId
        with get() = genreId
        and set ( value ) = genreId <- value

    member x.ArtistId
        with get() = artistId
        and set ( value ) = artistId <- value

    member x.Price
        with get() = price
        and set ( value ) = price <- value

    member x.AlbumArtUrl
        with get() = albumArtUrl
        and set ( value ) = albumArtUrl <- value 

    member x.Artist 
        with get() = artist
        and set ( value ) = artist <- value

So in above case i get the error "Album" is not defined.

Is there a way to solve this ?. Or i just have to rethink the whole of the hierarchy structure for my types?

share|improve this question
    
So basically Genre type contains a list Album and Album type contains Genre as a Field. Is that somehow possible to define this kind of heirarchy in F# ?. –  netmatrix01 Feb 6 '12 at 17:53
3  
Not near a comfortable computer to write a full answer, but in short - if you put the types in the same module/namespace you can have mutual recursive types. Just put them one after the other and replace the "type" keyword of the second with the keyword "and". If you go to MSDN's article about F# types, it'll have a more complete explanation. –  Ramon Snir Feb 6 '12 at 18:01

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If you need to define two types that are mutually recursive (meaning that they can both refer to each other), then you need to place them in a single file and use type ... and ... syntax.

In your example, this means that Genre and Album need to be defined like this:

// Start a definition block using 'type' as normal
type Genre() =  
  let mutable name = String.Empty 
  let mutable albums = [new Album()] 

  member x.Name  
      with get() = name 
      and set (value) = name <- value 
  member x.Albums 
      with get() = albums 
      and set ( value ) = albums <- value 

// Continue single type definition block using 'and'
and Album() = 
    let mutable genre = new Genre() 
    let mutable albumId = 0 
    let mutable artist = new Artist() 

    member x.Genre 
        with get() = genre 
        and set (value) = genre <- value      
    member x.AlbumId 
        with get() = albumId 
        and set ( value ) = albumId <- value      
    member x.Artist  
        with get() = artist 
        and set ( value ) = artist <- value 

However, your example is using F# in a very C#-style, so the code does not really look very elegant and it may not give you many of the benefits of functional programming.

If I wanted to represent a structure that you're using, then I probably wouldn't add reference to the genre into the Album type. When you place a list of albums inside a Genre, you will always be able to recover the genre when you process the data structure (i.e. to turn it into some other structure, maybe an F# record, that can be passed to data-binding). The beneift of F# is that it lets you write the domain on a few lines, but that works only for functional types.

Using discriminated unions with a single case, you can write:

// Type aliases to make code more readable
type Name = string
type AlbumID = int

// Simple type definitions to represent the domain
type Artist = Artist of Name
type Album = Album of AlbumID * Artist
type Genre = Genre of Name * Album list
share|improve this answer
    
aah cool, was thinking of trying that, i think i have read that earlier somewhere , kind of forgotten. Many thanks –  netmatrix01 Feb 6 '12 at 18:07
    
But i think we should have a cleaner way of separating types in separate files as well somehow, for now it works , cant complain much, was just thinking for large files might turn out to be tricky. –  netmatrix01 Feb 6 '12 at 18:10
1  
@netmatrix01 In a larger project, you would have to use interfaces. Define Genre and Album as interfaces (in a single file) and then the actual implementation can be separated between larger number of files and refer to these interfaces. –  Tomas Petricek Feb 6 '12 at 18:15
    
Yep certainly makes sense, thanks –  netmatrix01 Feb 6 '12 at 18:20
    
Discriminated Union way is way too neat, nice. –  netmatrix01 Feb 6 '12 at 18:21

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