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I am making a physics engine in c# / XNA, I have three basic objects...

Sphere Cube Plane

that are all derived from

GameObject

I store all my objects in a list of GameObjects and I would like to loop through this list and be able to call a CheckCollision function that will go to the correct function for each pair of objects

eg

go is a Sphere,

go2 is a Sphere

if(CheckCollision(go, go2))
{
  //do stuff
}

bool CheckCollision(Sphere one, Sphere two)
{
  //Check Sphere to Sphere
}

bool CheckCollision(Sphere sphere, Plane plane)
{
  //Check Sphere to Plane
}

and I would like it to just go to the correct function withour having to use if checks.

Thank you.

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possible duplicate of Optimizing multiple dispatch notification algorithm in C#? –  phoog Feb 6 '12 at 18:31
    
@Ramhound how was the syntax invalid? I did not include the entire file in my sample because I felt that all I needed to get my point accross was that I wanted to overload a function where my parameters had to be determined at runtime. phoog: I did not know to search for virtual dispatch for my problem. Thank you for answering rather than just redirectiong me to a link. –  chrispytoast Feb 6 '12 at 18:56
    
@chrispytoast - Forget it...Its not worth my time to explain what is wrong with your sample code. –  Ramhound Feb 6 '12 at 19:12
3  
@Ramhound - If you are going to bash my code and call it invalid the least you could do is inform me on how you think it could be improved. I am not sure where you are finding fault and if you would kindly point it out to me I would be happy to try and improve. –  chrispytoast Feb 6 '12 at 19:33
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You could use virtual dispatch:

abstract class GameObject
{
    abstract bool CheckCollision (GameObject other);
    abstract bool CheckCollision (Sphere other);
    abstract bool CheckCollision (Cube other);
    abstract bool CheckCollision (Plane other);
}

class Sphere : GameObject
{
    override bool CheckCollision (GameObject other) { return other.CheckCollision(this); }
    override bool CheckCollision (Sphere other) { /* ... implementation ... */ }
    override bool CheckCollision (Cube other) { /* ... implementation ... */ }
    override bool CheckCollision (Plane other) { /* ... implementation ... */ }
}

class Cube : GameObject
{
    override bool CheckCollision (GameObject other) { return other.CheckCollision(this); }
    override bool CheckCollision (Sphere other) { /* ... implementation ... */ }
    override bool CheckCollision (Cube other) { /* ... implementation ... */ }
    override bool CheckCollision (Plane other) { /* ... implementation ... */ }
}

class Plane : GameObject
{
    override bool CheckCollision (GameObject other) { return other.CheckCollision(this); }
    override bool CheckCollision (Sphere other) { /* ... implementation ... */ }
    override bool CheckCollision (Cube other) { /* ... implementation ... */ }
    override bool CheckCollision (Plane other) { /* ... implementation ... */ }
}

EDIT

Consider what happens when you have this:

GameObject go1 = new Sphere();
GameObject go2 = new Cube();
bool collision = go1.CheckCollision(go2);
  • The call goes to the abstract GameObject.CheckCollision(GameObject) method on the sphere.
  • Virtual dispatch means that we go to Sphere.CheckCollision(GameObject)
  • Sphere.CheckCollision(GameObject) calls the abstract GameObject.CheckCollision(Sphere) method on the cube.
  • Virtual dispatch means that we go to Cube.CheckCollision(Sphere)!

Therefore, no type-checking if statements are necessary.

EDIT 2

See Eric Lippert's answer at http://stackoverflow.com/a/2367981/385844; the first option -- the visitor pattern -- is essentially the approach outlined above. Eric's other answer at http://stackoverflow.com/a/9069976/385844 also discusses this issue.

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Note that method overloading is resolved at compile-time and that if-checks will still be required a run-time. –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Feb 6 '12 at 18:17
    
@OlivierJacot-Descombes the abstract and repetitive implementation of the GameObject overload should obviate the need for if checking. I have added a walk-through of the logic. –  phoog Feb 6 '12 at 18:20
    
Ok, I see, the CheckCollision of the other object will always be called with the static type of this. Very clever! (+1) –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Feb 6 '12 at 18:24
    
@OlivierJacot-Descombes exactly. I just remembered seeing a piece of Eric Lippert's recently, in which he discussed double virtual dispatch. I didn't read it thoroughly, but now I am inclined to try to find it again :) –  phoog Feb 6 '12 at 18:26
    
Found the link (an answer to a duplicate question): stackoverflow.com/a/2367981/385844 –  phoog Feb 6 '12 at 18:31
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I fear that this is not possible, unless you approximate your shapes with polygons, which would allow a generic approach. If you work with the exact mathematical representations then you will need to have special solutions for the different pairings. If you give numbers to the different shape types (1, 2, 3) you could represent a pair with 10* go.Number + go2.Number and use this number in a switch statement.

Note also that your approach has an O(n^2) performance where n is the number of objects. Consider using a more appropriate data structure than a list. K-D-trees are often used in order to store objects in a k-dimensional space. They are often used in conjunction with bounding boxes of the graphical objects. Each object would have a method or property yielding a bounding box. K-D-trees would reduce the number of required collision checks. See k-d tree on Wikipedia.

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+1 for k-d tree; that's new to me. –  phoog Feb 6 '12 at 18:28
    
I will look into the k-d tree. I have not implemented my broad phase yet but I am planning to make my broad phase quickly weed out many of the possible collisions so that my narrow phase will have to deal with only the ones that return positive on the broad phase –  chrispytoast Feb 6 '12 at 19:40
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