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I was wondering what's the best way to handle errors in programmation (i'm coding in C). I'm a newbie in programmation and this is what i'm doing :

if( action1 was successfull )
{
   [some code]
   if (action 2 was successfull)
   {
      [some more code ..]
      if (action 3 was successfull)
      {
         ETC ... 
      }
      else
      {
        [Handle error3]
      }
   }
   else
   {
     [handle error2]
   }
}
else
{
  [Handle error1]
}

But i think it's a bad habbit ... Can someone explain to me what's the most elegant way to do it ? Thanks

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I do it like this:

// more code
if (!action_1_succeeded())
{
   handle_error();
   return;
}

// more code
if (!action_2_succeeded())
{
   handle_error();
   return;
}

// more code
if (!action_3_succeeded())
{
   handle_error();
   return;
}

Usually, I will wrap up handle_error and return into a macro, so I just do check_error(some_statement());

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This is definitely the best way to do it in lieu of Exceptions. Always prefer flat to nested –  Tom Dignan Feb 6 '12 at 17:58
    
Does your action_x_succeeded() set a variable somewhere to know which error is handled ? –  Eregrith Feb 6 '12 at 18:02

Sometimes the code you show really is the best available option, but here are some alternatives.

Often you can structure your code like this instead:

if (action_1() failed) {
    report error;
    return -1;
}
if (action_2() failed) {
    report error;
    return -1;
}
/* etc */

This construct is why it's a common C idiom to return 0 on success or -1 on failure: it lets you write if (action_1() failed) as just if (action_1()).

If you need to do some cleanup before returning, and the clean-up actions nest neatly, this is another possibility:

if (action_1()) {
    report error;
    goto fail_a1;
}
if (action_2()) {
    report error;
    goto fail_a2;
}
if (action_3()) {
    report error;
    goto fail_a3;
}
/* etc */
return 0;

/* errors */
/* etc */
fail_a3:
  clean up from a2;
fail_a2:
  clean up from a1;
fail_a1:
  return -1;

You are hereby licensed to use goto in order to do this.

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You can create error-ids and associate an error handler with a particular type of error.

typedef struct _error {
  void (*handler)(struct _error *); 
  int i_params;
  char *c_params;
} error;

void nope(error * e) {}
void file_err(error * e) { exit(1); }

error handlers[200];

void check_error(int id) {
  handlers[id].handler(&handlers[id]);
}

enum error { ER_SUCCESS, ER_FILE};
int main() {
  handlers[ER_SUCCESS].handler = nope;
  handlers[ER_FILE].handler = file_err;
  check_error(action1());
  return 0;
}
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