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I have written this two .py code to communicate between each outher . A.py listens to port 8888 and sends data to 7777 B.py listens to port 7777 and sends data to 8888 Both of these client part stuck in an infinite loop after starting their server. where is the problem ?? If I use only server in A.py and client in B.py (and vice versa ) without any threading they works fine.

A.py:

import socket    
import threading
import thread
import time   


class server(threading.Thread):
    s = ''
    host = 0
    port = 0
    def __init__(self):
        threading.Thread.__init__(self)
        global s,host,port
        s = socket.socket()        
        host = socket.gethostname() 
        port = 8888

    def run(self):
        global s,host,port
        print 'Server started!'
        print 'Waiting for clients...'

        s.bind((host, port))       
        s.listen(5)                 
        c, addr = s.accept()     
        print 'Got connection from', addr
        while True:
            time.sleep(2)
            msg = c.recv(1024)
            if len(msg)==0 :  break
            print addr, ' >> ', msg




class client(threading.Thread):
    s = ''
    host = 0
    port = 0

    def __init__(self):
        threading.Thread.__init__(self)
        global s,host,port
        s = socket.socket()         
        host = socket.gethostname() 
        port = 7777 

    def run(self):

        try:
            time.sleep(5)
            global s,host,port
            print 'Connecting to ', host, port
            s.connect((host, port))
            print "Connectd"
            while True:
                time.sleep(2)
                msg = raw_input('CLIENT >> ')
                if len(msg)==0:break
                s.send(msg)
        except:
            print "Waiting"
            self.run()



thread1 = server()
thread2 = client();

thread1.start()
thread2.start()

thread1.join()
thread2.join();

B.py:

import socket    
import threading
import thread
import time   


class server(threading.Thread):
    s = ''
    host = 0
    port = 0
    def __init__(self):
        threading.Thread.__init__(self)
        global s,host,port
        s = socket.socket()        
        host = socket.gethostname() 
        port = 7777

    def run(self):
        global s,host,port
        print 'Server started!'
        print 'Waiting for clients...'

        s.bind((host, port))       
        s.listen(5)                 
        c, addr = s.accept()     
        print 'Got connection from', addr
        while True:
            time.sleep(2)
            msg = c.recv(1024)
            if len(msg)==0 :  break
            print addr, ' >> ', msg



class client(threading.Thread):
    s = ''
    host = 0
    port = 0

    def __init__(self):
        threading.Thread.__init__(self)
        global s,host,port
        s = socket.socket()         
        host = socket.gethostname() 
        port = 8888

    def run(self):
        try:
            time.sleep(5)
            global s,host,port
            print 'Connecting to ', host, port
            s.connect((host, port))
            print "connected"
            while True:
                time.sleep(2)
                msg = raw_input('CLIENT >> ')
                if len(msg)==0:break
                s.send(msg)
        except:
            print "waiting"
            self.run();



thread1 = server()
thread2 = client();

thread1.start()
thread2.start()

thread1.join()
thread2.join();
share|improve this question
1  
Where are the client parts? –  Sid Feb 6 '12 at 18:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
  • Using global s, host, port is the cause of the problem. In A.py, for instance, the server and client classes are both changing the same variables s, host and port. By changing the port to be the same value, you are either messing up either the server or the client (whichever runs first).

    Never use global if you don't have to, and you very rarely have to. In this case, your problem is fixed by using instance attributes.

  • Also, I suggest writing the client.run method without recursive calls to self.run(). Python has a limit to how many recursive calls you can make, and if the client has to wait too long, a recursive call here could cause your program to fail. Instead, you could use a while loop. (See below).

import argparse
import socket    
import threading
import thread
import time   

class server(threading.Thread):
    def __init__(self, port):
        threading.Thread.__init__(self)
        self.s = socket.socket()        
        self.host = socket.gethostname() 
        self.port = port

    def run(self):
        print 'Server started!'
        print 'Waiting for clients...'

        self.s.bind((self.host, self.port))       
        self.s.listen(5)                 
        c, addr = self.s.accept()     
        print 'Got connection from', addr
        while True:
            time.sleep(2)
            msg = c.recv(1024)
            if len(msg) == 0 :  break
            print addr, ' >> ', msg

class client(threading.Thread):
    def __init__(self, port):
        threading.Thread.__init__(self)
        self.s = socket.socket()         
        self.host = socket.gethostname() 
        self.port = port

    def run(self):
        while True:
            time.sleep(5)
            print 'Connecting to ', self.host, self.port
            try:
                self.s.connect((self.host, self.port))
                break
            except Exception as err:
                print "Waiting", err
        print "Connectd"
        while True:
            time.sleep(2)
            msg = raw_input('CLIENT >> ')
            if len(msg) == 0:break
            self.s.send(msg)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    parser = argparse.ArgumentParser()
    parser.add_argument('--server_port', type = int, default = 8888)
    parser.add_argument('--client_port', type = int, default = 7777)
    args = parser.parse_args()

    thread1 = server(args.server_port)
    thread2 = client(args.client_port)

    thread1.start()
    thread2.start()

    thread1.join()
    thread2.join()

Run it with

test.py --server 8888 --client 7777
test.py --server 7777 --client 8888
share|improve this answer
    
:) Thanks ..Wonderful reply –  qmaruf Feb 6 '12 at 19:33

I have a feeling your issue is caused at least in part by Python's Global Interpreter Lock, which limits a CPython interpreter to executing bytecode on a single thread. So even though your script uses multiple threads, only one of them can execute at a time. The reason your program hangs is because your server instance blocks while waiting for input, so it never releases the GIL, preventing the client from ever being able to send data.

Luckily for you, there are a couple workarounds:
- Using Python's multiprocessing package, have your program use processes instead of threads. Because you are sharing data between your classes using TCP sockets anyway, this should be a minimal code change.
- IronPython and Jython don't use a GIL in their implementations, so if you have your heart set on using threads instead of processes you might want to investigate one of those projects.

If you're interested, David Beazley created an interesting presentation about the GIL a few years ago.

share|improve this answer
    
the GIL should actually release when you block to wait for input. –  lunixbochs Feb 6 '12 at 19:04

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