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I'm new to Oracle, so my question might sound silly. I did go through the previous posts, but no luck. In the table, there is a column which is blank, and i am trying to find out the blank count in the column. I tried:

SELECT COUNT (COL_NAME) FROM TABLE WHERE COL_NAME IS NULL
SELECT COUNT (COL_NAME) FROM TABLE WHERE COL_NAME = ' '
SELECT COUNT (COL_NAME) FROM TABLE WHERE TRIM (COL_NAME)= ' '

The result to all the queries above is 0

However, when i did

SELECT COL_NAME DUMP (COL_NAME,1016) FROM TABLE

gave me:

COL_NAME       DUMP (COL_NAME,1016)
               NULL
               NULL
               NULL

and so on..

But there are hundreds or thousands of blank fields/empty fields in that column. Can anyone please help me to find count of those blank/empty fields in that column ? I am using Toad for Oracle 9.0.1.8

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2  
In Oracle NULL and '' (empty string) are equivalent. See also stackoverflow.com/questions/203493/… –  Mark Rotteveel Feb 6 '12 at 19:04

6 Answers 6

COUNT(expresion) returns the count of of rows where expresion is not null. So SELECT COUNT (COL_NAME) FROM TABLE WHERE COL_NAME IS NULL will return 0, because you are only counting col_name where col_name is null, and a count of nothing but nulls is zero. COUNT(*) will return the number of rows of the query:

SELECT COUNT (*) FROM TABLE WHERE COL_NAME IS NULL

The other two queries are probably not returning any rows, since they are trying to match against strings with one blank character, and your dump query indicates that the column is actually holding nulls.

If you have rows with variable strings of space characters that you want included in the count, use:

SELECT COUNT (*) FROM TABLE WHERE trim(COL_NAME) IS NULL

trim(COL_NAME) will remove beginning and ending spaces. If the string is nothing but spaces, then the string becomes '' which is equivalent to null in Oracle.

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1  
Great answer (+1). Incidentally, Oracle's string type is named "VARCHAR2" because it behaves, and will continue behave in a non-standard way (i.e. equates NULL with empty string). VARCHAR, while currently identical to VARCHAR2, might in the future start to behave in a more standard way (i.e. distinguish between NULL and empty string). –  Branko Dimitrijevic Feb 7 '12 at 23:39

A NULL column is not countable, however a row that has a NULL column is. So, this should do what you're looking for:

SELECT COUNT (*) FROM TABLE WHERE COL_NAME IS NULL OR LENGTH(TRIM (COL_NAME)) = 0

Note, that there are non-printing characters that this will not address. For example U+00A0 is the non-breaking space character and a line containing that will visually appear empty, but will not be found by the tests above.

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You can not count nulls (at least not in Oracle). Instead try this

SELECT count(1) FROM TABLE WHERE COL_NAME IS NULL
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Try the nvl function. select count(nvl(col_name,0)) from table.

Sorry I reread the OP. What is the table structure? is the column varchar or char as that will make a difference?

try

select count(col_name), distinct(col_name) from table group by distinct(col_name)  

/can't remember if you need distinct in the group by but I think not/

and see if it gives you a return with a column name that is blank.

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SELECT COUNT (COL_NAME) 
FROM TABLE 
WHERE TRIM (COL_NAME) IS NULL 
or COL_NAME='NULL'
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2  
is that an answer? if yes, please explain what you're doing and format the code. –  stefan Jun 16 '13 at 10:09

First, you know that "blank" and "null" are two COMPLETELY DIFFERENT THINGS? Correct?

Second: in most programming languages, "" means an "empty string". A zero-length string. No characters in it.

SQL doesn't necessarily work like that. If I define a column "name char(5)", then a "blank" name will be " " (5 spaces).

It sounds like you might want something like this:

select count(*) from my_table where Length(trim(my_column)) = 0;

"Trim()" is one of many Oracle functions you can use in PL/SQL. It's documented here:

http://www.techonthenet.com/oracle/functions/trim.php

'Hope that helps!

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1  
In Oracle, an empty string is the same as null. Among other things, this means that the query you provided will not work, as it will resolve as trim(my_column) = null, which is always false. –  Allan Feb 6 '12 at 19:04
2  
I don't think the length(null) = 0 in Oracle. Pretty sure that length(null) is null (whats the length of an undefined value? er, I don't know) –  tbone Feb 6 '12 at 19:56
1  
@paulsm4: you might want to carefully read your Ask Tom link. 1) It is talking about PL/SQL (procedural code) not SQL (queries). In Oracle's SQL, '' is equivelent to null. asktom.oracle.com/pls/asktom/… 2) The difference between '' and null shows up when the type is char. For VARCHAR strings: '' when assigned to a varchar2(1) becomes '' which is a zero length string and a zero length string is NULL in Oracle (it is no long '') –  Shannon Severance Feb 6 '12 at 19:57
1  
And tbone is correct, try: Try: select length(trim(cast(' ' as char(1)))) from dual;` –  Shannon Severance Feb 6 '12 at 19:58
1  
As to your comment that the modified post should work with MS SQL Server, it won't. SQL Server does not have trim, but instead rtrim and ltrim. And length is not length, but len. See: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms181984.aspx –  Shannon Severance Feb 6 '12 at 20:02

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