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The code below can surely run. My question is I allocated some memory in class function and return a pointer to it. But in main function, I build a new object and assign the pointer to it. But how to release the returned pointer? Do I need to manually do it?

#include "stdio.h"

class Complex{

private: 
    float real;
    float imaginary;

public:
    Complex(float, float);
    ~Complex(void) {};
    void set_real(float r);
    void set_imaginary(float i);
    float get_real();
    float get_imaginary();
    Complex* plus(Complex* another);
    Complex* minus(Complex* another);
    Complex* multiply(Complex* another);
};

Complex::Complex(float r, float i){
    this->real = r;
    this->imaginary = i;
}

void Complex::set_real(float r)
{this->real = r;}

void Complex::set_imaginary(float i)
{this->imaginary = i;}

float Complex::get_real() 
{return real;}

float Complex::get_imaginary()
{return imaginary;}

Complex* Complex::plus(Complex* another){
    Complex* result = new Complex(0,0);
    result->set_real(this->real + another->real);
    result->set_imaginary(this->imaginary + another->imaginary);
    return result;
}

Complex* Complex::minus(Complex* another){
    Complex* result = new Complex(0,0);
    result->set_real(this->real - another->real);
    result->set_imaginary(this->imaginary - another->imaginary);
    return result;  
}

Complex* Complex::multiply(Complex* another){
    Complex* result = new Complex(0,0);
    result->set_real((this->real * another->real) - (this->imaginary - another->imaginary));
    result->set_imaginary((this->imaginary*another->real) + (this->real*another->imaginary));
    return result;
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[]){
    Complex* c = new Complex(3,4);
    Complex* d = new Complex(6,9);
    Complex* e = new Complex(0,0);

    //will this line bring memory leak? Because all plus function already build a Complex object on leap. I don't know how to release it since I have to return it. 
    e = c->plus(d);

    printf("result is %f + i%f", e->get_real(), e->get_imaginary());

    delete c;
    delete d;
    delete e;
    return 1;
}
share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Joachim Pileborg, Mooing Duck, Christian Rau, luke, ildjarn Feb 6 '12 at 19:40

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
I see a title, and code, where's the description. What is wrong? What is the error message? What do you see? What did you expect to see? –  Mooing Duck Feb 6 '12 at 19:31
2  
Can you avoid using pointers altogether? –  Karlson Feb 6 '12 at 19:34

8 Answers 8

Yes, your code leaks like mad. If you absolutely need to return by pointer, return by std::unique_ptr<Complex> instead, which is nigh-leak proof. But your code doesn't need pointers for anything.

What you probably wanted was more like this:

Complex Complex::operator+(const Complex& another){ //pass by const reference
    Complex result = Complex(0,0);
    result.set_real(real + another.real);
    result.set_imaginary(imaginary + another.imaginary);
    return result;
}

or more simply:

Complex Complex::operator+(const Complex& another){
    return Complex(real + another.real, 
                   imaginary + another.imaginary);
}

In C++ we generally pass and return objects "by value" or "by const reference" and don't use pointers a whole lot for function parameters or returns. Pointers are error-prone. Passing by value (and using operator+) allows this:

int main() {
    Complex c = Complex(3,4);
    Complex d = Complex(6,9);
    Complex e = Complex(0,0);
    Complex e = a + b; //magic!  no leaks!
    printf("result is %f + i%f", e.get_real(), e.get_imaginary());
    return 0;
}

On unrelated notes:

Complex::Complex(float r, float i) 
    :real(r)  //faster for some types.  This is "more correct"
    ,imaginary(i) 
{}

float Complex::get_real() const  //const since it doesn't change anything
{return real;}

and finally, in main, return 0 means "everything worked fine" and returning any other value means "something went wrong"

share|improve this answer
    
Great. So informative!! Thanks. I am a java-C++ programmer indeed. –  lkahtz Feb 6 '12 at 19:52
    
@ilkahtz: we can tell :D In general, do not use thing*, try to use std::unique_ptr<thing> instead. Far safer. –  Mooing Duck Feb 6 '12 at 19:53
    
Checking out the documents now. Amazing~~!!! :=) –  lkahtz Feb 6 '12 at 20:00
Complex* e = new Complex(0,0);

    //will this line bring memory leak? Because all plus function already build a Complex object on leap. I don't know how to release it

since I have to return it. e = c->plus(d);

Yes it will leak. You first allocate e and then you reassign it to point to whatever is returned by your function. Now the memory you allocated first is lost in space without ever being deallocated. You should do this:

Complex* e;
e = e->plus(d);

Then there is other issues like, why are you creating plus and minus functions, when you should really overload operator+ and operator-.

Returning everything by pointer is silly. Just return by value.

share|improve this answer

Instead of working with all pointers, just return values.

Complex* Complex::plus(Complex* another){
    Complex* result = new Complex(0,0);
    result->set_real(this->real + another->real);
    result->set_imaginary(this->imaginary + another->imaginary);
    return result;
}

Becomes:

Complex Complex::plus(const Complex& another){
    Complex result(0,0);
    result.set_real(real + another.real);
    result.set_imaginary(imaginary + another.imaginary);
    return result;
}
share|improve this answer

Since your class only contains two floats, I'd be inclined to suggest not using pointers at all (i.e. just return a Complex).

This would only be 8 bytes (at least on my system), which is the same size (again, at least on my system) as a pointer.

share|improve this answer

Remove all your heap allocation, ie dont use new at all.

Transform:

Complex* Complex::plus(Complex* another){
    Complex* result = new Complex(0,0);
    result->set_real(this->real + another->real);
    result->set_imaginary(this->imaginary + another->imaginary);
    return result;
}

into:

Complex Complex::plus(const Complex& another) const{
    Complex result(0,0);
    result.set_real(this.real + another.real);
    result.set_imaginary(this.imaginary + another.imaginary);
    return result;
}
share|improve this answer
    
@Victor Sehr: My only problem with this is while returning it makes a temporary copy of Complex and that may not be efficient depending on how many times this method is called. It may be perfectly fine if saving every ounce of speed isn't an issue. Alternatively, a refrence may be passed to the method. –  Sid Feb 6 '12 at 19:37
1  
It'd certainly be faster than dynamically allocating memory. You're just adjusting the stack pointer by the size of a Complex, writing a couple of floats to it, and then probably copying it to a register to return it (assuming all of this isn't optimized away). –  James McLaughlin Feb 6 '12 at 19:41
    
@Sid Well calling new will certainly be orders of magnitude slower than copying two floats. –  Christian Rau Feb 6 '12 at 19:44
    
@ChristianRau Agreed. But how about passing a reference as a parameter for the result. –  Sid Feb 6 '12 at 19:55
    
@Sid I guess any possible performance difference will be removed by any optimizing/inlining/copy-eliding compiler anyway and if it's not inlined, then you also have a reference argument to copy. All in all I guess there won't be any difference (maybe a single instruction or something in that order of magnitude). Whereas I'm usually not somebody who cries "help, premature optimization!" all the time, in this case it certainly is, considering the huge useability gain of operator overloading and the just negligable performance gains (if any) of passing a reference. –  Christian Rau Feb 6 '12 at 20:02
e = c->plus(d);

will cause a leak, because the Complex pointed to by e is not freed before the new pointer to the new Complex is assigned.

Despite the fact, that the STL has a template <typename T> class complex;

#include <complex>

you can implement a member function for arithmetic returning values:

Complex Complex::plus(const Complex& another)const{
    Complex result(0,0);
    result.set_real(this->real + another.real);
    result.set_imaginary(this->imaginary + another.imaginary);
    return result;
}
share|improve this answer

One way is to use auto_ptr or a similar smart ptr.

Alternatively, you could also pass in a reference to the result objects in your plus or minus methods instead of a pointer that needs to be allocated. In other words, handle memory outside the class module.

share|improve this answer
    
The use of new/delete here is superfluous. Regular stack declarations should be used not smart pointers. –  luke Feb 6 '12 at 19:35
    
Your alternative suggestion isn't really any better than your first suggestion. Don't make things even worse for Java-C++ prgrammers by showing them that there exists something that just cleans up their memory for them, so they are free to spam smart pointers everywhere, like in simple value type operators. –  Christian Rau Feb 6 '12 at 19:40

The (one?) problem is that you're allocating an 'e' pointer and then re-assigning the pointer later to the results of the add(). Inside the add function it's already creating a new Complex object to return.

So to fix this, in main you shouldn't be allocating E ahead of time.

[or you could restructure the code to use copy/assignments too]

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