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http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_35_0/doc/html/boost/get_id405862.html

template<typename U, typename T1, typename T2, ..., typename TN> 
  U & get(variant<T1, T2, ..., TN> & operand);

The function succeeds only if the content is of the specified type U.

Is the boost::get a template function?

Most of cases, when we call a template function, the function itself can deduce the parameter types and so we don't have to manually feed in the type.

Why in this case we have to manually provide the type? Is it because that the template function has no way to deduce the type of return value so we have to provide the type for the return type?

  boost::variant<int, std::string> my_first_variant;

  my_first_variant = 10;

  assert( boost::get<int>(my_first_variant) == 10)
                      ^
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2  
"Is it because that the template function has no way to deduce the type of return value so we have to provide the type for the return type?" Yes, exactly -- you answered your own question. ;-] –  ildjarn Feb 6 '12 at 19:39

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Is it because that the template function has no way to deduce the type of return value so we have to provide the type for the return type?

Yes, there is no way to deduce the contained type at compile-time. Remember that the variant contains one of T1, T2, ..., TN at run-time.

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You cannot deduce the return type of a function, so that is the one remaining template parameter that you need to specify.

Also note that templates are compile-time code generators, while boost::variant holds any of a given collection of types that vary at runtime. So it makes no sense to "automatically retrieve the current type", because that isn't a static concept.

In other words, you compile the static instruction "get me type U", and the call may or may not succeed at runtime, depending on the current state of the variant at that time.

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