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Before I get to my question/problem, here is the basic structure of my application:

In my MainWindow.xaml (the main view in this case) I have a Label (I realize I should change this to a TextBlock, but that is a separate issue):

<Label Name="StatusLabel" Content="{Binding Path=Status}"/>

It's corresponding ViewModel (MainWindowViewModel) contains another ViewModel (SiteListViewModel) and a Status property:

public class MainWindowViewModel : ViewModelBase
{
    public SiteListViewModel SiteList { get; set; }
    public String Status
    {
        get { return SiteList.Status; }
    }
}

As you can see, MainWindowViewModel's Status property returns the SiteListViewModel instances' Status property, which is defined as such:

public class SiteListViewModel : ViewModelBase
{
    private string status;
    public String Status 
    {
        get { return this.status; }
        set
        {
            this.status = value;
            base.OnPropertyChanged("Status");
        }
    }
}

SiteListViewModel's Status property is updated in various places during asynchronous processes to keep the user informed as to what is going on. This is done with simple assignment calls such as:

Status = String.Format(Properties.Resources.SiteListViewModel_Status_LoadingJobs, count + 1, totalSites);

Another important note, Both MainWindowViewModel and SiteListViewModel inherit from ViewModelBase which implements INotifyPropertyChanged.

Now for the actual question/problem:

The label does not update.

However, if I change the binding in the view to this:

<Label Name="StatusLabel" Content="{Binding Path=SiteList.Status}"/>

It works fine. Which seems to indicate that I am missing something at the MainWindowViewModel level. I could leave it as it is, but that reaches into the structure of the child view model, which is not something I want to do.

Can someone point to what I am doing wrong?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Of course it does not update, the binding system listens to change events for the property you bind to on the type owning that property, you do not fire any notifications at all.

You could forward the notifications of the nested VM:

public MainWindowViewModel
{
    SiteList.PropertyChanged += (s,e)
        => if (e.PropertyName == "Status") OnPropertyChanged("Status");
}

Where OnPropertyChanged is a method to raise PropertyChanged your VM base-class should have something like that.

I would recommend dropping the property though, it's redundant as you can bind directly though SiteList (also that property should fire change notifications in its setter). Also you would need to detach the handler from the old instance and re-attach it to the new instance whenever the SiteList changes (could be done in the setter as well).

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I know it will work if I bind directly to SiteList.Status (I said it near the end of the post), but it feels like I am breaking encapsulation by doing that. I guess I had a poor understanding of how the PropertyChanged events' are handled. I thought it didn't matter what "level" the event was fired as long as it was bound to "parent" property at the XAML/UI level. –  Brandon Smith Feb 6 '12 at 20:27
    
+1 to get this off my "Unanswered Questions" list. and because you answered pretty much the same thing I did at the same time :) –  Rachel Feb 6 '12 at 20:29

Because MainWindow's DataContext is MainWindowViewModel.

Label will then "inherit" the same DataContext, so Label's DataContext is also MainWindowViewModel. This is why you must do SiteList.Status. (Because you're not raising PropertyChanged in MainWindowViewModel but are in SiteListViewModel.)

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That is not the point here, Status exists on the MainWindowViewModel as well. –  H.B. Feb 6 '12 at 20:09
    
right-o. minor update to explain why one syntax works but not the other. –  jberger Feb 6 '12 at 20:11

Just because something implements INotifyPropertyChanged does not mean it will automatically know when properties change. You need to raise the PropertyChanged event in your code.

In your example, that would be done by registering to SiteListViewMode.PropertyChanged, and raising a PropertyChanged notification for Status whenever the status changes.

public class MainWindowViewModel : ViewModelBase
{
    public SiteListViewModel SiteList { get; set; }
    public String Status
    {
        get { return SiteList.Status; }
    }

    public MainWindowViewModel()
    {
        // Of course, verify property isn't null first. 
        // Also, it's probably best to attach this in the setter
        // so you can unhook the event from old items too
        SiteList.PropertyChanged += SiteList_PropertyChanged;
    }

    void SiteList_PropertyChanged(object sender, PropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        if (e.PropertyName == "Status")
            RaisePropertyChanged("Status");
    }
}
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