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I want to put in a space at every third character when formatting a number. According to this spec:

  it "should format an amount" do
    spaces_on( 1202003 ).should == "1 202 003"
  end

and I came up with this piece of code that does the job

  def spaces_on amount
    thousands = amount / 1000
    remainder = amount % 1000
    if thousands == 0
      "#{remainder}"
    else
      zero_padded_remainder = '%03.f' % remainder
      "#{spaces_on thousands} #{zero_padded_remainder}"
    end
  end

So my question is if this was the best way to do it. I suspect that there may be a regex way around it but I am not sure I will like the readability of that. (On the other hand - the %03.f magic is not very readable either....)

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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted
>> def spaces_on number
>>   number.to_s.gsub(/\D/, '').reverse.gsub(/.{3}/, '\0 ').reverse
>> end
=> nil
>> spaces_on 12345678
=> "12 345 678"

Maybe there's an argument that regular expressions aren't amazingly readable, but personally I think they're simpler to understand than having to think in recursion.

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+1 you took the answer right out of my mind! =) –  maerics Feb 6 '12 at 20:15
    
nice piece. I find that many developers don't know about regex at all which makes me avoid it - but the same is probably true about recursion as well! Point taken. –  froderik Feb 6 '12 at 20:17
    
Of course the magic here isn't the regular expression - once you know the goal of the method it's easy to pick out the 'adding spaces every 3 characters' bit. The reverse/reverse is the only real mental leap. –  Gareth Feb 6 '12 at 20:21
4  
While this solution is correct for the given spec, it won't handle other input such as -1000 or 12345678.0. –  Mark Thomas Feb 6 '12 at 20:32
    
@Gareth well, you may go other way and get rid of reverse / reverse but use more complex regexp... –  Alexis Feb 6 '12 at 20:49
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def spaces_on(number,sep=" ")
  number.to_s.tap do |s|
    :go while s.gsub!(/^([^.]*)(\d)(?=(\d{3})+)/, "\\1\\2#{sep}")
  end
end

NUMBERS = [ 1, 12, 123, 1234, 12345, 123456, 1234567,
            1.0, 1.2, 1.23, 1.234, 1.2345, 1.23456, 1.234567,
            12.3, 12.34, 12.345, 12.3456,
            123.4, 123.45, 123.456, 123.4567,
            1234.5, 1234.5, 1234.56, 1234.567,  1234.5678 ]

NUMBERS.each do |n|
  puts "%10s: %s" % [  n, spaces_on(n).inspect ]
  puts "%10s: %s" % [ -n, spaces_on(-n).inspect ]
end

Produces:

         1: "1"
        -1: "-1"
        12: "12"
       -12: "-12"
       123: "123"
      -123: "-123"
      1234: "1 234"
     -1234: "-1 234"
     12345: "12 345"
    -12345: "-12 345"
    123456: "123 456"
   -123456: "-123 456"
   1234567: "1 234 567"
  -1234567: "-1 234 567"
       1.0: "1.0"
      -1.0: "-1.0"
       1.2: "1.2"
      -1.2: "-1.2"
      1.23: "1.23"
     -1.23: "-1.23"
     1.234: "1.234"
    -1.234: "-1.234"
    1.2345: "1.2345"
   -1.2345: "-1.2345"
   1.23456: "1.23456"
  -1.23456: "-1.23456"
  1.234567: "1.234567"
 -1.234567: "-1.234567"
      12.3: "12.3"
     -12.3: "-12.3"
     12.34: "12.34"
    -12.34: "-12.34"
    12.345: "12.345"
   -12.345: "-12.345"
   12.3456: "12.3456"
  -12.3456: "-12.3456"
     123.4: "123.4"
    -123.4: "-123.4"
    123.45: "123.45"
   -123.45: "-123.45"
   123.456: "123.456"
  -123.456: "-123.456"
  123.4567: "123.4567"
 -123.4567: "-123.4567"
    1234.5: "1 234.5"
   -1234.5: "-1 234.5"
    1234.5: "1 234.5"
   -1234.5: "-1 234.5"
   1234.56: "1 234.56"
  -1234.56: "-1 234.56"
  1234.567: "1 234.567"
 -1234.567: "-1 234.567"
 1234.5678: "1 234.5678"
-1234.5678: "-1 234.5678"
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yay - getting into deep regex space! –  froderik Feb 6 '12 at 21:05
    
In the ActionView docs the thing you call sep is called a delimiter. separator is used for the char between the fractional and integer digits. (I don't have an opinion on what's best, but I was confused at first.) Otherwise +1 –  steenslag Feb 6 '12 at 21:20
    
Oh, my try was called to_s_with_delim, defined on Numeric, that's why i noticed. spaces_on is not a very good method name IMHO. But still +1 :) –  steenslag Feb 6 '12 at 21:24
    
@steenslag I agree on the name issue; I (and others) were coding to the specs of the OP –  Phrogz Feb 6 '12 at 22:59
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Is this Rails?

number_with_delimiter(@number, :delimiter => ' ')

This comes from ActionView::Helpers::NumberHelper.

If you want a standalone version that works with negative numbers and decimal point, use this:

def spaces_on number
  parts = number.to_s.split('.')
  parts[0].gsub!(/(\d)(?=(\d\d\d)+(?!\d))/, "\\1 ")
  parts.join(".")
end

The logic in the regex is this: Capture each digit that is followed only by groups of 3 digits (with no remaining digits), and output it with the space.

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Yours fails for 123.4567, producing "123.4 567". However, +1 for mentioning the Rails version, where the source code can be viewed. (Once you throw away the i18n "fluff", the core of splitting on the ., using gsub! on the integer half and joining again is sort of elegant.) –  Phrogz Feb 6 '12 at 21:03
    
Good catch. I've updated mine to mimic the helper. Should work in that case now. –  Mark Thomas Feb 6 '12 at 21:13
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Little modification of the Gareth's solutions (more complex regexp, but no reversing):

def spaces_on number
  number.to_s.gsub(/\d(?=(...)+$)/, '\0 ')
end

It works for negative numbers too (but doesn't work for floats).

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