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I have a client that sends an xml feed which I parse using the following code. This code works.

reviews = from item in xmlDoc.Descendants("node")
                          select new ForewordReview()
                          {
                              PubDate = (string)item.Element("created"),
                              Isbn = (string)item.Element("isbn"),
                              Summary = (string)item.Element("review")
                          };

After getting all my "reviews" I cast the IEnumerable as a List and return it out. Originally, I was having a good and easy time parsing their XML which used to look like this:

<reviews>
    <node>
        <created>01-01-1900</created>
        <ISBN>12345657890123</ISBN>
        <Review>This is a nice and silly book</Review>
    </node>
    <node>
        <created>01-01-2011</created>
        <ISBN>1236245234554</ISBN>
        <Review>This is a stupid book</Review>
    </node>
    <node>
        <created>12-06-1942</created>
        <ISBN>1234543234577</ISBN>
        <Review>This is a old, naughty book</Review>
    </node>
</reviews>

They have, however, changed their schema, to which I don't have access, and now their XML is adding in a final <node> tag to the end which does not contain the decedent elements I am looking for, and so, my parsing breaks on this last tag and I throw an exception. Here is an example:

<reviews>
    <node>
        <created>01-01-1900</created>
        <ISBN>12345657890123</ISBN>
        <Review>This is a nice and silly book</Review>
    </node>
    <node>
        <created>01-01-2011</created>
        <ISBN>1236245234554</ISBN>
        <Review>This is a stupid book</Review>
    </node>
    <node>
        <created>12-06-1942</created>
        <ISBN>1234543234577</ISBN>
        <Review>This is a old, naughty book</Review>
    </node>
    <node>
        <count>4656</count>
    </node>
</reviews>

I need to know if there is a way to ignore this final tag (its always at the end of the document) even though it has the same name as all the other "node" tags I am looking for. I do have a try catch around this block of code but it doesnt return the list of good reviews out if it sees this error.

Thanks guys.

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1  
maybe add a where item.Element("count") == null (or otherway round "created" != null) –  ordag Feb 6 '12 at 20:22
    
@ordag I actually incorporated yours into my solution as well along with some null checking from delltrees suggestion. Thanks. –  Isaiah Nelson Feb 6 '12 at 21:58

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

add null checking

PubDate = (string)(item.Element("created") ?? ""),
Isbn = (string)(item.Element("isbn") ?? ""),
Summary = (string)(item.Element("review") ?? "")

Always add null checking to everything you do. Just good practice. In this case, it will eliminiate this error, but potentially crop up an error later in your program where you assume these strings are not empty, so make sure and null-check later as well.

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So if it encounters the weird node, it will load up the pubdate, isbn and summary in a object and give each an empty string? I could definitely handle that downstream, if thats the case. –  Isaiah Nelson Feb 6 '12 at 20:23
    
exactly. string.Empty may be a better choice, but this was just a quick writeup –  deltree Feb 6 '12 at 20:23
    
@deltree: I think "" is more readable than string.Empty. –  Matti Virkkunen Feb 6 '12 at 20:33
    
@deltree Your solution was actually a really good idea, and exposed something I didnt have before which was null checking. I tried a where clause as well but you get the approval. –  Isaiah Nelson Feb 6 '12 at 21:57

If it's always the last node,

var nodes = xmlDoc.Descendants("node");
reviews = nodes.Take(nodes.Count() - 1).Select(...);
share|improve this answer
    
Its always the last "node" but not the last element. The "reviews" element is the root element. Does that matter? –  Isaiah Nelson Feb 6 '12 at 20:21
    
@fullNelson: This would take all elements called "node" except the last one. Did you read the code? –  Matti Virkkunen Feb 6 '12 at 20:22
    
I did read it. I never use this style of syntax (as I am new to linq) so I dont know quite how this works. –  Isaiah Nelson Feb 6 '12 at 20:28
    
@fullNelson: They are completely normal extension method calls. Surely you've used methods before? –  Matti Virkkunen Feb 6 '12 at 20:29

Something like this should do the trick:

var reviews = from item in xmlDoc.Descendants("node").Where(x => x.Element("created") != null)
select new
{
    PubDate = (string)item.Element("created"),
    Isbn = (string)item.Element("isbn"),
    Summary = (string)item.Element("review")
};

You can additional null checks for the other elements if you wish.

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You could count the number of nodes and then use this overload of Where, which also passes an index number: (http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb549418.aspx)

public static IEnumerable<TSource> Where<TSource>(
this IEnumerable<TSource> source,
Func<TSource, int, bool> predicate)

So, something like this:

var count = xmlDoc.Descendants("node").Count();
xmlDoc.Descendants("node").Where((node,index) => index < count-1).Select(..)
share|improve this answer
    
That's what Take is for. –  Matti Virkkunen Feb 6 '12 at 20:29
    
I am certain I know what is going on here, but the difference in syntax from my code throws me off. I think what you and Matti are using is a 'dot' notation. For me, I dont know how to add this filter before the clause in a where statement. –  Isaiah Nelson Feb 6 '12 at 20:32
    
@fullnelson Same statements are more easily written/read using linq syntax and some are more easily written/read using the extension methods (as above). It's good to know that the linq statements can be directly translated to extension methods. –  MichaelvR Feb 6 '12 at 20:39
1  
And the translation is exactly what the compiler does when you write "LINQ syntax", which makes the whole syntax a bit redundant. –  Matti Virkkunen Feb 6 '12 at 21:19
    
Don't really agree with you on that. In my opinion some statements are more readable when using the 'linq syntax'. So that doesn't make it redundant. –  MichaelvR Feb 7 '12 at 7:31

You could throw a "where" clause in there.

reviews = from item in xmlDoc.Descendants("node") where item.Descendants().Any(n => n.Name == "Review")
                      select new ForewordReview()
                      {
                          PubDate = (string)item.Element("created"),
                          Isbn = (string)item.Element("isbn"),
                          Summary = (string)item.Element("review")
                      };

This sample would just be checking for a child node called "Review", so it would be a better idea to check for all of your required child nodes.

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