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I've got an application that's fairly heavily based on custom classes, and am hitting a wall on attempting to do a custom replacement based on the type that a given replacement token is.

What I'd like to do (looking at the code below) is given a certain string, loop through the _tokens object. For each token found, identify the type of object provided in the TokenReplacement and replace it with the value of the same object, provided by the User object.

Any help or other approaches toward this would be much appreciated.

Edit: Forgot to mention that this gives me a stack overflow error.

private BasicUser BU = new BasicUser();
private readonly List<Token> _tokens = new List<Token>
{
  new Token
  {
    TokenName = "Lan ID",
    TokenIdentifier = "<!--LANID-->",
    TokenReplacement = this.BU.LanID
  },
  new Token
  {
    TokenName = "First Name",
    TokenIdentifier = "<!--FirstName-->",
    TokenReplacement = new BasicUser().FirstName
  },
  new Token
  {
    TokenName = "Last Name",
    TokenIdentifier = "<!--LastName-->",
    TokenReplacement = new BasicUser().LastName
  }
};

public string ReplaceTokens(string Input, string LanID)
{
  string OutputString = "";
  BasicUser User = GetParticipantInformation(Input);
  foreach (var token in _tokens)
  {
    token.TokenReplacement.GetType();
    OutputString = OutputString.Replace(token.TokenName, "Token replacement");
  }
  return OutputString;
}
share|improve this question
    
Do you know what's overflowing? I don't see any recursive calling or anything else that would hint at a stack overflow. –  deepee1 Feb 6 '12 at 20:46
1  
It looks like you've omitted something important. There's no point in the token.TokenReplacement.GetType() line. OutputString will always be empty... –  Austin Salonen Feb 6 '12 at 20:47
2  
You should provide a small working example of your issue if at all possible. –  Austin Salonen Feb 6 '12 at 20:48
1  
Am I missing somthing? how does this involve reflection? –  IanNorton Feb 6 '12 at 20:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yes, you can use reflection. Just use PropertyInfo type for TokenReplacement and assign to it the property you need like the following:

class Token {
    string TokenName;
    string TokenIdentifier;
    PropertyInfo TokenReplacement;
}

private readonly List<Token> _tokens = new List<Token>
{
  new Token
  {
    TokenName = "Lan ID",
    TokenIdentifier = "<!--LANID-->",
    TokenReplacement = typeof(BasicUser).GetProperty("LanID")
  },
  new Token
  {
    TokenName = "First Name",
    TokenIdentifier = "<!--FirstName-->",
    TokenReplacement = typeof(BasicUser).GetProperty("FirstName")
  }
};

public string ReplaceTokens(string Input, string LanID)
{
  string OutputString = "";
  BasicUser User = GetParticipantInformation(Input);
  foreach (var token in _tokens)
  {
    OutputString = OutputString.Replace(token.TokenName, token.TokenReplacement.GetValue(User, null).ToString());
  }
  return OutputString;
}

If you don't need to this to be based on reflection, you can also go Matti Virkkunen's way which allows to specify some more complex queries on objects than simple property read.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! This is exactly what I needed. –  TFerrell Feb 6 '12 at 21:33

I think the easiest way to modify this piece of code to do what you want would be to modify the tokens to contains functions instead of ... objects or whatever TokenReplacement currently is.

class Token {
    Func<BasicUser, object> TokenReplacement;
    // ...
}

// ...

  new Token
  {
    TokenName = "Lan ID",
    TokenIdentifier = "<!--LANID-->",
    TokenReplacement = user => user.LanID,
  },
  new Token
  {
    TokenName = "First Name",
    TokenIdentifier = "<!--FirstName-->",
    TokenReplacement = user => user.FirstName,
  },

// ...

OutputString = OutputString.Replace(token.TokenName,
    token.TokenReplacement(User).ToString());

Another approach would be to lose the _tokens list altogether, and instead build a dictionary of values, and then replace everything that looks like a tag with values from the dictionary. Things that looks like tags can easily be found with a regex.

share|improve this answer
    
Good solution. I'd hypothesize he really wants token.TokenIdentifier as the first parameter of the Replace but his example leaves plenty of ambiguity. –  deepee1 Feb 6 '12 at 20:50
    
@deepee1: Probably. I just copy-pasted that. –  Matti Virkkunen Feb 6 '12 at 20:51
1  
Great solution, but OP was asking for reflection-based solution. But if it is not a requirement, I like this one, and would go for the same. –  Krizz Feb 6 '12 at 21:08
    
@Krizz: I usually ignore arbitrary constraints like that and try to focus on the problem, not the current, non-working solution. –  Matti Virkkunen Feb 6 '12 at 21:18

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