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A function of mine produces an array - an ordered, contiguously numbered set of records. But as far as I know Scala Array is a mutable collection, while functional approach suggests it would make more sense to return an immutable collection in a general case. So I just call Array.toIndexedSeq to return an IndexedSeq instead of Array. Can this be considered a correct thing to do? Doesn't it introduce any inobvious behaviour which can influence the function and the result usage and be probably considered undesirable? Are there any better practices for the issue?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Can this be considered a correct thing to do?

Yes.

Doesn't it introduce any inobvious behaviour which can influence the function and the result usage and be probably considered undesirable?

No, not that I know of.

Are there any better practices for the issue?

If possible, try to eliminate the use of array altogether, unless of course the performance is paramount.

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The only possibly non-obvious thing I can think of is that array.toIndexedSeq doesn't create a simple wrapper over the array itself like Java's Collections.unmodifiable* methods do, but copies the elements into a new collection. (Otherwise later changes in the array could cause the "immutable" sequence to suddenly mutate.)

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The non-obvious being Java's behavior, of course. :-) Well, Java returns a "read only" version, not an immutable one. –  Daniel C. Sobral Feb 7 '12 at 0:03
    
What's the difference between "read only" and immutable, @daniel-c-sobral? –  Ivan Feb 8 '12 at 3:23
1  
@Ivan, immutable collections do not support mutation. Read-only collections on the other hand are just unmodifiable views of mutable collections. See line#1014 onwards here. –  missingfaktor Feb 8 '12 at 9:41

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