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I have the following in my page.

$(document).ready(function() {
    function setTheTimeout(){
        var t=setTimeout("alertMsg()",3000);
    }
    function alertMsg(){
        alert("Hello");
    }
    setTheTimeout();
});

I am getting an error in Firebug alertMsg() is not defined?

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You don't need to assign "t" if you're never going to use it. –  Diodeus Feb 6 '12 at 21:12

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Change

var t=setTimeout("alertMsg()",3000);

To

var t=setTimeout(alertMsg,3000);

See the setTimeout documentation from Mozilla Developer Network. Using a string is the same as using eval, and eval is bad!

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Why can setTheTimeout access alertMsg when passed by reference, but not when passed via an eval'd string ? –  Loïs Di Qual Feb 6 '12 at 21:15
    
@idiqual It can't, it is a scoping issue as bfavaretto said (stackoverflow.com/a/9167330/219743). I just would not recommend using a string as a parameter for the same reasons I wouldn't recommend eval. –  Gazler Feb 6 '12 at 21:17
    
because you're executing the reference, and eval is always bad... just pretend it doesn't exist is the best way around it! –  Relic Feb 6 '12 at 21:22
    
Thanks. That got it. –  james Feb 6 '12 at 22:52

That function only exists in the scope of the document.ready callback. Try this:

$(document).ready(function() {
    function setTheTimeout(){
        var t=setTimeout("alertMsg()",3000);
    }

    setTheTimeout();
});

function alertMsg(){
    alert("Hello");
}
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Scope isn't the issue in that case, your answer won't fix his problem. –  Relic Feb 6 '12 at 21:26
    
@Relic, I believe scope is the issue here. My answer does work, and is very close to his original code. Now, that doesn't mean that I'm advocating for eval. I'm just not sure if this is the right place for discussing that. –  bfavaretto Feb 6 '12 at 21:44
    
no... it doesn't... sorry: jsfiddle.net/DztCG eval or not. –  Relic Feb 6 '12 at 22:03
    
Thanks for the help. –  james Feb 6 '12 at 22:52
1  
@Relic, it works, your fiddle fails because it's setup to run onDomReady. See this fork. And, in case it's not clear yet, I agree that passing the function by reference to setTimeout is by far the best option, eval is evil, everything. I just like it when the answers here explain what is going on, and I was trying to explain the scope problem. The implied eval on setTimeout was a secondary problem (not what was causing the reported error). Unfortunately, none of the answers here explained both issues satisfactorily (mine included). –  bfavaretto Feb 7 '12 at 1:00

Take the quotes and parenthesis off the call to alertMsg (jsFiddle).

function setTheTimeout(){
    var t=setTimeout(alertMsg,3000);
}
function alertMsg(){
    alert("Hello");
}
setTheTimeout();
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Thanks for the help. –  james Feb 6 '12 at 22:52

Working example: http://jsbin.com/imovuk/edit#javascript,html

Use the following approach.

$(document).ready(function() { 
    function setTheTimeout(){ 
        var t=setTimeout(function () {alertMsg();},3000); 
    } 
    function alertMsg(){ 
        alert("Hello"); 
    } 
    setTheTimeout(); 
}); 

Eval is evil

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Thanks for the help. –  james Feb 6 '12 at 22:52

It's defined a little differently than you'd expect... try this, and call back:

$(document).ready(function() {
    function setTheTimeout(){
        var t=setTimeout(alertMsg,3000);
    }
    function alertMsg(){
        alert("Hello");
    }
    setTheTimeout();
});
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the help. –  james Feb 6 '12 at 22:52
    
never a problem! –  Relic Feb 6 '12 at 23:42

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