Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I've got the following INSTEAD OF DELETE trigger, which sends an email while rolling back any Delete attempts.

ALTER TRIGGER tr_OnDel_Orders
ON  ORDERS 
INSTEAD OF DELETE
AS 
BEGIN

SET NOCOUNT ON;

declare @b varchar(5000)
Declare @OrderID BIGINT,

SELECT @OrderID  = OrderID
FROM deleted d

set @b = 'Someone attempted to delete the following order:' + CHAR(10);
set @b = @b + ' OrderID: ' + cast(@OrderID as varchar(30)) + CHAR(10);
set @b = @b + ' UserID: ' +  SYSTEM_USER

RAISERROR('Cannot delete order', 16, 1)
ROLLBACK TRAN

EXEC msdb.dbo.sp_send_dbmail @recipients = 'myemail@mycompany.com',
                         @body = @b,
                         @subject = 'Attempt to Delete an order' 


RETURN
END
GO

This works when I try to delete an order from the ORDERS table. However, I cannot understand why, this trigger keeps sending emails periodically with empty body. As far as I'm aware, there are no obvious attempts to delete an order. What else could cause such blank emails? Thank you.

share|improve this question
3  
This trigger don't work with rows sets, you know? Also, has orders a foreign key with delete cascade option? –  danihp Feb 6 '12 at 21:36
3  
Perhaps it fires when someone does delete orders where 1=0, and @OrderID ends up being null. That would make @b null too, I think. –  Blorgbeard Feb 6 '12 at 21:37
1  
Only one way to find out: SQL Profiler. –  user596075 Feb 6 '12 at 21:43
    
You can set up an extended events trace to capture the TSQL call stack when the trigger fires Example code here –  Martin Smith Feb 6 '12 at 21:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

This trigger handles multi-row deletes, and also doesn't bother sending you a meaningless e-mail if someone fires a delete statement that doesn't delete any rows:

ALTER TRIGGER dbo.tr_OnDel_Orders
ON dbo.ORDERS 
INSTEAD OF DELETE
AS 
BEGIN
  IF EXISTS (SELECT 1 FROM deleted)
  BEGIN
    SET NOCOUNT ON;

    DECLARE @b VARCHAR(5000) = '';

    SELECT @b = @b + ',' + CONVERT(VARCHAR(12), OrderID)
        FROM deleted;

    SET @b = 'Someone attempted to delete the following orders:' 
        + CHAR(10) + @b + CHAR(10) + ' UserID: ' +  SYSTEM_USER;

    ROLLBACK TRANSACTION; -- should probably check @@TRANCOUNT first!

    EXEC msdb.dbo.sp_send_dbmail 
         @recipients = 'myemail@mycompany.com',
         @body = @b,
         @subject = 'Attempt to Delete an order';

    RAISERROR('Cannot delete order(s)', 16, 1);
  END

  RETURN;
END
GO
share|improve this answer

The most common error about triggers is that they are generally created as they will work once for each deleted record.

But if more than 1 records are deleted with one DELETE statement, the trigger should be able to handle all deleted records as Aaron suggested.

It is important to avoid single value variables in a trigger, developers should build set based solutions within triggers

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.