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While going through the code for parser, e.g. Parser.cpp inside clang/Parse directory of clang compiler

switch (Close) {
default: break;
case tok::r_paren : LHSName = "("; DID = diag::err_expected_rparen; break;
case tok::r_brace : LHSName = "{"; DID = diag::err_expected_rbrace; break;
case tok::r_square: LHSName = "["; DID = diag::err_expected_rsquare; break;
case tok::greater:  LHSName = "<"; DID = diag::err_expected_greater; break;
case tok::greatergreatergreater:
                    LHSName = "<<<"; DID = diag::err_expected_ggg; break;
}

I see that the default is at the beginning. Is there any reason for keeping it that way. Usually we keep the default at the end so I am a bit confused.

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1  
I don't believe it matters, in fact if your default block isn't doing anything anyway you can omit it entirely. –  AJG85 Feb 6 '12 at 22:18
3  
@RichardPennington: Might that not seriously be a reason? I understood there can indeed be a performance advantage in putting the most frequently use cases first. For example, see books.google.com/… –  Fred Larson Feb 6 '12 at 22:32
1  
A compiler has several options when generating a switch statement and usually choice the best one for the cases. For example, a lot of consecutive cases, e.g. 1, 2, 3, ... would be generated into a jump table, while a sparse set of cases (1, 200, 1000) would probably be done with the equivalent of if ... else if ... In that second case, then the earlier cases might be more efficient. I wouldn't count on it, though. –  Richard Pennington Feb 6 '12 at 22:36
    
I agree with @Fred Larson's view. It seems like we can get some performance advantage while using the most frequent use cases first. –  Aditya Kumar Feb 7 '12 at 0:20

2 Answers 2

The order makes no differences, as long as you have included your breaks.

As an aside, I like to put the break immediately before every case or default. It's much easier to verify this standard has been followed than to try to look ahead to the end of each case statement.

switch (Close) {
  break; default:
  break; case tok::r_paren : LHSName = "("; DID = diag::err_expected_rparen;
  break; case tok::r_brace : LHSName = "{"; DID = diag::err_expected_rbrace;
  break; case tok::r_square: LHSName = "["; DID = diag::err_expected_rsquare;
  break; case tok::greater:  LHSName = "<"; DID = diag::err_expected_greater;
  break; case tok::greatergreatergreater: LHSName = "<<<"; DID = diag::err_expected_ggg;
}

You might find this easier to understand if you interpret break to mean "Don't fall through into this case from any other case." instead of "Don't fall through from this case into any succeeding case."

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2  
Not sure that makes it any clearer. What about first statement that does not look legal. And What about the last case it does not have a break. It also makes moving the cases statements around more difficult as have to make a note weather the next line has a break or not. –  Loki Astari Feb 6 '12 at 22:35
    
@LokiAstari, I'm pretty sure that a break at the end is always redundant, and therefore it is not incorrect to leave it off. Also, the break at the start is redundant also. I've never seen g++ complain about this - maybe it's an extension. I better look it up now. As a result, there is no difficulty in moving lines around - every line, without exception, will have a break at the start - that makes things very easy. –  Aaron McDaid Feb 6 '12 at 22:40
2  
If the syntax causes questions for the people reading it, then it's not really any clearer. ;-] –  ildjarn Feb 6 '12 at 22:44
    
:-) @ildjarn. It makes it easier for me to read my own code. And I might be the only person that ever reads my code :-/ Even if I don't convince everyone to use this, I'd be happy if I could verify it is compliant with the standard. –  Aaron McDaid Feb 6 '12 at 22:45
    
By my reading of C++11 §6.4 it does appear to be standard-compliant; the break; outside of any case/default label is simply ignored. –  ildjarn Feb 6 '12 at 22:55

The only time I see the position of a default matter is when doing something like this, which is a Duff's Device type construct and should probably never be attempted on modern platforms. :)


void copyAligned4Bytes(u32 *in, u32 *out, int numBytes)
{
  assert((numBytes & 0x03) == 0);

  while(numBytes)
  {
    switch(numBytes)
    {
      default: *out++ = *in++; numBytes -= 4;
      case 12: *out++ = *in++; numBytes -= 4;
      case 8: *out++ = *in++; numBytes -= 4;
      case 4: *out++ = *in++; numBytes -= 4;
    }
  }
}

Ah, the joys of coding in C as closer to assembler as possible to get a certain type of jump table.

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