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I have a single SQL Server table with 10 different triggers that fire on the same INSERT and UPDATE.

Is there any performance advantage to consolidating the SQL inside the 10 triggers into a single trigger?

The single consolidated trigger would do the same thing as the 10 different triggers, but only one trigger would get fired instead of 10.

Thanks!

Update: Thanks for the great feedback. I updated my question to indicate that I am wondering about performance advantages. I didn't think of the "absolute control over order" advantage. I am aware that these various triggers should be refactored at some point, but am wondering more about performance of one versus many triggers.

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Does that mean that you also have 10 different joins between the INSERTED and DELETED pseudo tables? You might as well just join once especially as these aren't indexed. –  Martin Smith Feb 6 '12 at 22:43
    
I would not answer without benchmarking. Can you post what your triggers are doing? –  AlexKuznetsov Feb 7 '12 at 2:05
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Consolidating triggers can make a huge performance boost. For example consider the following table, two triggers, and an update:

CREATE TABLE dbo.TriggerTest(ID INT NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY,
s INT NOT NULL)
GO
INSERT INTO dbo.TriggerTest(ID, s)
SELECT n, 1 FROM dbo.Numbers
WHERE n BETWEEN 1 AND 100000;
GO

CREATE TRIGGER TriggerTestNoSignChange
ON dbo.TriggerTest
AFTER UPDATE
AS
BEGIN
    IF EXISTS(SELECT * FROM INSERTED AS i JOIN DELETED AS d
    ON i.id = d.id WHERE sign(i.s)*sign(d.s)<0)
    BEGIN
        RAISERROR('s cannot change sign', 16, 1);
        ROLLBACK ;
    END
END
GO

CREATE TRIGGER TriggerTestNoBigChange
ON dbo.TriggerTest
AFTER UPDATE
AS
BEGIN
    IF EXISTS(SELECT * FROM INSERTED AS i JOIN DELETED AS d
    ON i.id = d.id WHERE ABS(i.s - d.s)>5)
    BEGIN
        RAISERROR('s cannot change by more than 5', 16, 1);
        ROLLBACK ;
    END
END
GO


UPDATE dbo.TriggerTest SET s=s+1
WHERE ID BETWEEN 1 AND 1000;

This update uses 1671 ms CPU and 4M reads. Let's consolidate two triggers and rerun the update:

DROP TRIGGER TriggerTestNoSignChange;
DROP TRIGGER TriggerTestNoBigChange;
GO
CREATE TRIGGER TriggerTestNoBigChangeOrSignChange
ON dbo.TriggerTest
AFTER UPDATE
AS
BEGIN
    IF EXISTS(SELECT * FROM INSERTED AS i JOIN DELETED AS d
    ON i.id = d.id WHERE sign(i.s)*sign(d.s)<0 OR ABS(i.s - d.s)>5)
    BEGIN
        RAISERROR('s cannot change sign or change by more than 5', 16, 1);
        ROLLBACK ;
    END
END
GO


UPDATE dbo.TriggerTest SET s=s+1
WHERE ID BETWEEN 1 AND 1000;

The same update runs twice us fast. Big surprise. ;)

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A very straight forward explanation. Thank you. Most of my triggers are not compatible enough to be able to take advantage of the same INSERT or UPDATE statement as you have done, but I could probably use some of your solution and some of Aaron's solution (call stored procedures) to get a handle on all of these triggers in one trigger each for the AFTER INSERT and AFTER UPDATE events. –  Kuyenda Feb 7 '12 at 20:38
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The primary advantage I see is that you'll have full control over the order of execution, which you don't have now.

I might suggest a hybrid approach: 1 trigger that calls 10 stored procedures, each encapsulating the logic of one of the existing triggers.

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I agree with Joe. By combining into one trigger you get:

  • full control over order
  • better visibility into all of the operations in one place

You'll also possibly be able to more clearly see places where some of this logic can be combined, and with a bigger piece of code may be able to invoke motivation to clean it up. 10 triggers sounds like an awful lot. What is the trend for the operations that are being performed in each of the triggers? Is it auditing, updating totals somewhere, etc.? I am sure there are some things that could be handled by better up-front logic (e.g. stored procedures that handle the initial insert/update operations, computed columns, even indexed views to prevent the need to perform after-DML computations).

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Yes to all of the above. Rather than refactor this older database we're federating it. I needed to add one more trigger to facilitate the process of replicating the data in it someplace else and am wondering if this new trigger will be the straw that broke the camel's back. –  Kuyenda Feb 6 '12 at 23:09
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There'd be a lot more have SPs to to the insert and update and gettingb rid of the triggers, other than that I agree with @Joe Stefanelli. Can't see why you'd get a noticeable performance up date from doing it either way.

10 triggers, shudder...

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