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So the app reads from an external file a bunch of strings, each on a separate line.

For example:

and
cake
here

It is not arranged in any particular order. I need to read these letters and put them into linked list and finally sort them.

I need help on doing that:

Here is the current code:

import java.util.*;
import java.io.*;
public class LinkedList
{
  static File dataInpt;
  static Scanner inFile;
  public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException
  {
    dataInpt=new File("C:\\lldata.txt");
    inFile=new Scanner(dataInpt);
    Node first = insertInOrder();
    printList(first);
  }
  public static Node getNode(Object element)
  {
    Node temp=new Node();
    temp.value=element;
    temp.next=null;
    return temp;
  }
  public static void printList(Node head)
  {
    Node ptr; //not pointing anywhere
    for(ptr=head;ptr!=null;ptr=ptr.next)
      System.out.println(ptr.value);
    System.out.println();
  }
  public static Node insertInOrder()
  {
    Node first=getNode(inFile.next());
    Node current=first,previous=null;
    Node last=first;
    int count=0;
    while (inFile.hasNext())
    {
      if (previous!=null
          && ((String)current.value).compareTo((String)previous.value) > 0)
      {
        last.next=previous;
        previous=last;
      }
      if (previous!=null
          && ((String)current.value).compareTo((String)previous.value) < 0)
      {
        current.next=last;
        last=current;
      }
      previous=current;
      current=getNode(inFile.next());
    }
    return last;
  }
}

But that gives an infinite loop with "Cat".

Here is the data file:

Lol
Cake
Gel
Hi
Gee
Age
Rage
Tim
Where
And
Kite
Jam
Nickel
Cat
Ran
Jug
Here
share|improve this question
3  
Is this homework? If not, you are probably overcomplicating things; you should be using LinkedList and Collections.sort. –  Louis Wasserman Feb 6 '12 at 22:32
    
Why not use java.util.LinkedList and then Collections.sort()? –  Michael Feb 6 '12 at 22:32
    
how big is this file? –  Shawn Feb 6 '12 at 22:32
2  
@OP... The difference is, if this is homework people will advice you as a student (which means, doing something to show a point, even if it is highly ineffective). If this is not homework then we will assist you as a colleague programmer. And as a "colleague programmer" you are not doing it right (as pointed out, just use ArrayList or LinkedList and Collections.sort). So, if this is homework you should tag it accordingly in order to get the kind of assistance that you want. –  Anthony Accioly Feb 6 '12 at 22:45
1  
It is class work and I must use insertion sort for this. Can you please help me. I need it done today and it doesn't seem like anyone will help me. :( –  DemCodeLines Feb 6 '12 at 22:49

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Okay, self-study. Split the reading and inserting. Though old and new code both have 14 lines of code, it makes it more intelligable.

public static Node insertInOrder() {
    Node first = null;
    while (inFile.hasNext()) {
        String value = inFile.next().toString();
        first = insert(first, value);
    }
    return first;
}

/**
 * Insert in a sub-list, yielding a changed sub-list.
 * @param node the sub-list.
 * @param value
 * @return the new sub-list (the head node might have been changed).
 */
private static Node insert(Node node, String value) {
    if (node == null) { // End of list
        return getNode(value);
    }
    int comparison = node.value.compareTo(value);
    if (comparison >= 0) { // Or > 0 for stable sort.
        Node newNode = getNode(value); // Insert in front.
        newNode.next = node;
        return newNode;
    }
    node.next = insert(node.next, value); // Insert in the rest.
    return node;
}

This uses recursion (nested "rerunning"), calling insert inside insert. This works like a loop, or work delegation to a clone, or like a mathematical inductive proof.


Iterative alternative

also simplified a bit.

private static void Node insert(Node list, String value) {
    Node node = list;
    Node previous = null;
    for (;;) {
        if (node == null || node.value.compareTo(value) >= 0) {
            Node newNode = getNode(value);
            newNode.next = node;
            if (previous == null)
                list = newNode;
            else
                previous.next = newNode;
            break;
        }
        // Insert in the rest:
        previous = node;
        node = node.next;
    }
    return list;
}
share|improve this answer
    
You might want to explain the recursion. The original code didn't even have a loop in the insertion code; recursion might be an advanced topic for a student. –  Michael Myers Feb 6 '12 at 23:01
    
So how exactly would this be called? I think I would call the insertInOrder() method and set it to some Node variable in the main block. Is that right? –  DemCodeLines Feb 6 '12 at 23:08
    
Like @MichaelMyers said, recursion shouldn't be in this code. I shouldn't be using recursion unless I really need to and I have seen other people do it without recursion. –  DemCodeLines Feb 6 '12 at 23:10
    
@MichaelMyers so right, especially for other beginners. –  Joop Eggen Feb 6 '12 at 23:18
    
@user1079641 Yes, the call does not change. it can be done without recursion, but recursion saves variables, is simpler. I will give the iterative (non-recursive) version. –  Joop Eggen Feb 6 '12 at 23:21

Ok, I don't remember exactly school theory about insertion sort, but here is somehow a mix of what I think it is and your code: import java.io.File; import java.io.IOException; import java.util.Scanner;

public class LinkedList {
    public static class Node {
        public String value;
        public Node next;
    }

    static File dataInpt;
    static Scanner inFile;

    public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {
        inFile = new Scanner("Lol\r\n" + "Cake\r\n" + "Gel\r\n" + "Hi\r\n" + "Gee\r\n" + "Age\r\n" + "Rage\r\n" + "Tim\r\n" + "Where\r\n"
                + "And\r\n" + "Kite\r\n" + "Jam\r\n" + "Nickel\r\n" + "Cat\r\n" + "Ran\r\n" + "Jug\r\n" + "Here");
        Node first = insertInOrder();
        printList(first);
    }

    public static Node getNode(String element) {
        Node temp = new Node();
        temp.value = element;
        temp.next = null;
        return temp;
    }

    public static void printList(Node head) {
        Node ptr; // not pointing anywhere
        for (ptr = head; ptr != null; ptr = ptr.next) {
            System.out.println(ptr.value);
        }
        System.out.println();
    }

    public static Node insertInOrder() {
        Node current = getNode(inFile.next());
        Node first = current, last = current;
        while (inFile.hasNext()) {
            if (first != null && current.value.compareTo(first.value) < 0) {
                current.next = first;
                first = current;
            } else if (last != null && current.value.compareTo(last.value) > 0) {
                last.next = current;
                last = current;
            } else {
                Node temp = first;
                while (current.value.compareTo(temp.value) < 0) {
                    temp = temp.next;
                }
                current.next = temp.next;
                temp.next = current;
            }
            current = getNode(inFile.next());
        }
        return first;
    }
}

And it works like a charm. Of course this far from optimal, both in terms of performance and code reuse.

share|improve this answer

In relatively simple code like that in your question, a good exercise to understanding it is to work through a few interations of your loop, inspecting the values of all your local variable to see the effect of your code. You can even do it by hand if the code is simple. If it is too difficult to do by hand, your code is probably too complicated. If you can't follow it, how can you know if you are doing what you intend. For example, I could be wrong, but this appears the be the state at the top of each iteration of the loop. It starts falling apart on the third time through, and by the fourth you have a severe problem as your list becomes disjointed.

1)last = first = Lol, current = previous = null
  Lol->null
2)last = first = previous = Lol, current = Cake
  Lol->Lol
3)first = Lol, last = Cake, previous = Cake, current = Gel 
  Cake->Lol->Lol 
4)first = Lol, last = Cake, previous = Cake, current = Hi
  Cake->Gel, Lol->Lol
share|improve this answer

Quite honestly, if I were running the course, I would consider the correct answer to be:

List<String> list = new LinkedList<String>();
// read in lines and: list.add(word);
Collections.sort(list);
share|improve this answer
public static Node insertInOrder()
{
    Node first=getNode(inFile.next());
    Node current=first,previous=null;
    Node last=first;
    int count=0;
    while (inFile.hasNext())
    {
        if (previous!=null
            && ((String)current.value).compareTo((String)previous.value) > 0)
        {
            last.next=previous;
            previous=last;
        }
        if (previous!=null
            && ((String)current.value).compareTo((String)previous.value) < 0)
        {
            current.next=last;
            last=current;
        }
        previous=current;
        current=getNode(inFile.next());
    }
    return last;
}

First of all, you never do anything with the last line read from the file, so that's not ever inserted. You have to read the line and create the new Node before relinking next pointers.

Then, if last and previous refer to the same Node and the data of current is larger than that of previous,

if (previous!=null
    && ((String)current.value).compareTo((String)previous.value) > 0)
{
    last.next=previous;
    previous=last;
}

You set last.next = last, breaking the list. From the code (in particular the absence of a sort(Node) function), it seems as though you want to sort the list as it is created. But you only ever compare each new Node with one other, so that doesn't maintain order.

For each new node, you have to find the node after which it has to be inserted, scanning from the front of the list, and modify current.next and the predecessor's next.

share|improve this answer
    
So would the only thing to be changed in the code is to manage the two nodes or are there any other significant changes in the code to be made? –  DemCodeLines Feb 6 '12 at 23:20
    
Also, yes, part of the task is to arrange the linked list in alphabetical order as it is being read from the file –  DemCodeLines Feb 6 '12 at 23:22
    
It would need significant changes. I've looked at Joop Eggen's code, I would recommend that, it's easier to follow and get right. Starting with your code would involve too much pointer-juggling, it's too easy to lose the overview of what's pointing where. –  Daniel Fischer Feb 6 '12 at 23:32

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