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We're building a custom keyboard with the essence of the following code.

- (void)viewDidLoad
{
    [super viewDidLoad];

    UIButton *numericButton;

    for (int i = 1; i < 13; i++) {

        numericButton = [UIButton buttonWithType:UIButtonTypeCustom];

        int xorig, yorig;
        int w = BUTTON_SIZE_W_EDG;
        int tag = i;

        numericButton.frame = CGRectMake(xorig, yorig + BUTTON_OFFSET, w, BUTTON_SIZE_H);
        numericButton.tag = tag;

        [numericButton addTarget:self 
                          action:@selector(buttonPressed:) 
                forControlEvents:UIControlEventTouchUpInside];

        [self.view addSubview:numericButton];
    }
}

My question is whether reassigning numericButton to a new UIButton is causing a memory leak? buttonWithType is returning an autoreleased UIButton but I'm not sure whether the previous numericButton ever gets released with this code. Would it make any difference putting the declaration inside the for loop?

thanks

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This code does not leak. As you said buttonWithType returns an autoreleased object. Since you do not alloc, copy, new or retain, you don't claim ownership of anything and you don't need to (auto)release anything.

It would not make any difference to put the declaration in the loop. But it would be the natural place to put it.

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If you want to ensure that your auto released objects free up resources, you can put them in an autorelease pool. For Example

- (void)viewDidLoad
{
    [super viewDidLoad];

    UIButton *numericButton;

    for (int i = 1; i < 13; i++) {
    @autoreleasepool {
        numericButton = [UIButton buttonWithType:UIButtonTypeCustom];

        int xorig, yorig;
        int w = BUTTON_SIZE_W_EDG;
        int tag = i;

        numericButton.frame = CGRectMake(xorig, yorig + BUTTON_OFFSET, w, BUTTON_SIZE_H);
        numericButton.tag = tag;

        [numericButton addTarget:self 
                          action:@selector(buttonPressed:) 
                forControlEvents:UIControlEventTouchUpInside];

        [self.view addSubview:numericButton];
    }
    }
}

This method would be especially useful if you were instantiating a lot of autorelease objects.

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This totally misses the point. Since you are adding the objects to self.view, it doesn't matter when the (auto)release takes place - the object will certainly not be deallocated. The only thing this piece of code does, is make things slower because it creates and destroys 12 NSAutoreleasePool objects with no positive side-effect whatsoever. (unless, very unlikely in -viewDidLoad, self.view == nil) –  mvds Feb 7 '12 at 17:51

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