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Here's my code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <wait.h>
#include <readline/readline.h>

#define NUMPIPES 2

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    char *bBuffer, *sPtr, *aPtr = NULL, *pipeComms[NUMPIPES], *cmdArgs[10];
    int fdPipe[2], pCount, aCount, i, status, lPids[NUMPIPES];
    pid_t pid;

    pipe(fdPipe);

    while(1) {
    	bBuffer = readline("Shell> ");

    	if(!strcasecmp(bBuffer, "exit")) {
    		return 0;
    	}

    	sPtr = bBuffer;
    	pCount = -1;

    	do {
    		aPtr = strsep(&sPtr, "|");
    		pipeComms[++pCount] = aPtr;
    	} while(aPtr);

    	for(i = 0; i < pCount; i++) {
    		aCount = -1;

    		do {
    			aPtr = strsep(&pipeComms[i], " ");
    			cmdArgs[++aCount] = aPtr;
    		} while(aPtr);

    		cmdArgs[aCount] = 0;

    		if(strlen(cmdArgs[0]) > 0) {
    			pid = fork();

    			if(pid == 0) {
    				if(i == 0) {
    					close(fdPipe[0]);

    					dup2(fdPipe[1], STDOUT_FILENO);

    					close(fdPipe[1]);
    				} else if(i == 1) {
    					close(fdPipe[1]);

    					dup2(fdPipe[0], STDIN_FILENO);

    					close(fdPipe[0]);
    				}

    				execvp(cmdArgs[0], cmdArgs);
    				exit(1);
    			} else {
    				lPids[i] = pid;

    				/*waitpid(pid, &status, 0);

    				if(WIFEXITED(status)) {
    					printf("[%d] TERMINATED (Status: %d)\n",
    						pid, WEXITSTATUS(status));
    				}*/
    			}
    		}
    	}

    	for(i = 0; i < pCount; i++) {
    		waitpid(lPids[i], &status, 0);

    		if(WIFEXITED(status)) {
    			printf("[%d] TERMINATED (Status: %d)\n",
    				lPids[i], WEXITSTATUS(status));
    		}
    	}
    }

    return 0;
}

(The code was updated to reflect he changes proposed by two answers below, it still doesn't work as it should...)

Here's the test case where this fails:

nazgulled ~/Projects/SO/G08 $ ls -l
total 8
-rwxr-xr-x 1 nazgulled nazgulled  7181 2009-05-27 17:44 a.out
-rwxr-xr-x 1 nazgulled nazgulled   754 2009-05-27 01:42 data.h
-rwxr-xr-x 1 nazgulled nazgulled  1305 2009-05-27 17:50 main.c
-rwxr-xr-x 1 nazgulled nazgulled   320 2009-05-27 01:42 makefile
-rwxr-xr-x 1 nazgulled nazgulled 14408 2009-05-27 17:21 prog
-rwxr-xr-x 1 nazgulled nazgulled  9276 2009-05-27 17:21 prog.c
-rwxr-xr-x 1 nazgulled nazgulled 10496 2009-05-27 17:21 prog.o
-rwxr-xr-x 1 nazgulled nazgulled    16 2009-05-27 17:19 test
nazgulled ~/Projects/SO/G08 $ ./a.out 
Shell> ls -l|grep prog
[4804] TERMINATED (Status: 0)
-rwxr-xr-x 1 nazgulled nazgulled 14408 2009-05-27 17:21 prog
-rwxr-xr-x 1 nazgulled nazgulled  9276 2009-05-27 17:21 prog.c
-rwxr-xr-x 1 nazgulled nazgulled 10496 2009-05-27 17:21 prog.o

The problem is that I should return to my shell after that, I should see "Shell> " waiting for more input. You can also notice that you don't see a message similar to "[4804] TERMINATED (Status: 0)" (but with a different pid), which means the second process didn't terminate.

I think it has something to do with grep, because this works:

nazgulled ~/Projects/SO/G08 $ ./a.out 
Shell> echo q|sudo fdisk /dev/sda
[4838] TERMINATED (Status: 0)

The number of cylinders for this disk is set to 1305.
There is nothing wrong with that, but this is larger than 1024,
and could in certain setups cause problems with:
1) software that runs at boot time (e.g., old versions of LILO)
2) booting and partitioning software from other OSs
   (e.g., DOS FDISK, OS/2 FDISK)

Command (m for help): 
[4839] TERMINATED (Status: 0)

You can easily see two "terminate" messages...

So, what's wrong with my code?

share|improve this question
    
It looks like grep didn't reach the end. It failed to print out the third matching line ("prog.o"). –  UncleO May 27 '09 at 17:27
    
It did print the third matching line, I just didn't copy the whole thing correctly. I've already edited the post to fix that. –  Ricardo Amaral May 27 '09 at 17:40
    
I have a tiny (999LOC) shell example written for a university assignment years ago. patch-tag.com/r/xsh In particular, job.c#job_run and process.c#process_run contain the pipeline setup, and main.c#waitpid_wrapper contains the wait-handling. –  ephemient May 27 '09 at 22:10
    
Thanks, but I rather keep trying to do it myself and post my issues when I have them, I learn more and better that way. Also, your code is way more than I need to know for the time being. –  Ricardo Amaral May 27 '09 at 23:50
    
My code is a lot less to read than Bash :) You'll probably have to figure out how to deal with setpgid and tcsetpgrp eventually, and all the other fun that comes with job control and the historical design of UNIX sessions and terminal process groups... –  ephemient May 28 '09 at 20:30

6 Answers 6

up vote 20 down vote accepted

Even after the first command of your pipeline exits (and thust closes stdout=~fdPipe[1]), the parent still has fdPipe[1] open.

Thus, the second command of the pipeline has a stdin=~fdPipe[0] that never gets an EOF, because the other endpoint of the pipe is still open.

You need to create a new pipe(fdPipe) for each |, and make sure to close both endpoints in the parent; i.e.

for cmd in cmds
    if there is a next cmd
        pipe(new_fds)
    fork
    if child
        if there is a previous cmd
            dup2(old_fds[0], 0)
            close(old_fds[0])
            close(old_fds[1])
        if there is a next cmd
            close(new_fds[0])
            dup2(new_fds[1], 1)
            close(new_fds[1])
        exec cmd || die
    else
        if there is a previous cmd
            close(old_fds[0])
            close(old_fds[1])
        if there is a next cmd
            old_fds = new_fds
if there are multiple cmds
    close(old_fds[0])
    close(old_fds[1])

Also, to be safer, you should handle the case of fdPipe and {STDIN_FILENO,STDOUT_FILENO} overlapping before performing any of the close and dup2 operations. This may happen if somebody has managed to start your shell with stdin or stdout closed, and will result in great confusion with the code here.

Edit

   fdPipe1           fdPipe3
      v                 v
cmd1  |  cmd2  |  cmd3  |  cmd4  |  cmd5
               ^                 ^
            fdPipe2           fdPipe4

In addition to making sure you close the pipe's endpoints in the parent, I was trying to make the point that fdPipe1, fdPipe2, etc. cannot be the same pipe().

/* suppose stdin and stdout have been closed...
 * for example, if your program was started with "./a.out <&- >&-" */
close(0), close(1);

/* then the result you get back from pipe() is {0, 1} or {1, 0}, since
 * fd numbers are always allocated from the lowest available */
pipe(fdPipe);

close(0);
dup2(fdPipe[0], 0);

I know you don't use close(0) in your present code, but the last paragraph is warning you to watch out for this case.

Edit

The following minimal change to your code makes it work in the specific failing case you mentioned:

@@ -12,6 +12,4 @@
     pid_t pid;

-    pipe(fdPipe);
-
     while(1) {
         bBuffer = readline("Shell> ");
@@ -29,4 +27,6 @@
         } while(aPtr);

+        pipe(fdPipe);
+
         for(i = 0; i < pCount; i++) {
                 aCount = -1;
@@ -72,4 +72,7 @@
         }

+        close(fdPipe[0]);
+        close(fdPipe[1]);
+
         for(i = 0; i < pCount; i++) {
                 waitpid(lPids[i], &status, 0);

This won't work for more than one command in the pipeline; for that, you'd need something like this: (untested, as you have to fix other things as well)

@@ -9,9 +9,7 @@
 int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
     char *bBuffer, *sPtr, *aPtr = NULL, *pipeComms[NUMPIPES], *cmdArgs[10];
-    int fdPipe[2], pCount, aCount, i, status, lPids[NUMPIPES];
+    int fdPipe[2], fdPipe2[2], pCount, aCount, i, status, lPids[NUMPIPES];
     pid_t pid;

-    pipe(fdPipe);
-
     while(1) {
         bBuffer = readline("Shell> ");
@@ -32,4 +30,7 @@
                 aCount = -1;

+                if (i + 1 < pCount)
+                    pipe(fdPipe2);
+
                 do {
                         aPtr = strsep(&pipeComms[i], " ");
@@ -43,11 +44,12 @@

                         if(pid == 0) {
-                                if(i == 0) {
-                                        close(fdPipe[0]);
+                                if(i + 1 < pCount) {
+                                        close(fdPipe2[0]);

-                                        dup2(fdPipe[1], STDOUT_FILENO);
+                                        dup2(fdPipe2[1], STDOUT_FILENO);

-                                        close(fdPipe[1]);
-                                } else if(i == 1) {
+                                        close(fdPipe2[1]);
+                                }
+                                if(i != 0) {
                                         close(fdPipe[1]);

@@ -70,4 +72,17 @@
                         }
                 }
+
+                if (i != 0) {
+                    close(fdPipe[0]);
+                    close(fdPipe[1]);
+                }
+
+                fdPipe[0] = fdPipe2[0];
+                fdPipe[1] = fdPipe2[1];
+        }
+
+        if (pCount) {
+            close(fdPipe[0]);
+            close(fdPipe[1]);
         }
share|improve this answer
    
I see what you mean, but I'm finding it rather difficult to understand that pseudo code and everything it's doing. That old and new fds pipe thing is confusing me. Also, not sure what you mean by the last paragraph. –  Ricardo Amaral May 27 '09 at 20:19
    
Ignoring the old_fds/new_fds thing, if I change your code to run pipe() within the readline loop and close(fdPipe[]) before waiting, it works in the immediate sense that the failing pipeline in the question no longer fails. The rest is cautionary, as *other things that might be wrong as you go further. –  ephemient May 27 '09 at 20:39
    
I see that you probably didn't notice in the code but I was just considering the case with 2 commands and one pipe would suffice. Still, I didn't know I needed more than one for more than 2 commands so that will come in handy. But for now, I'll concentrate is just two, try to understand that and move to the next step. I still don't quite get everything you said besides that and that I need to close them in the parents. I think it's better I fix this for two commends and then post back my code and if I'll be doing something wrong or missing something, hopefully, you'll point it out. –  Ricardo Amaral May 27 '09 at 23:54
3  
This is the best answer to accept - I agree. And the generalization to multi-stage pipelines will be important eventually. I believe that some shells - probably bash amongst them - fork off a single process to run the entire pipeline, and that first child eventually execs the last process in the pipeline, after fixing up the plumbing between the various other stages. The child also becomes a process group leader and other things so that job control works sanely. –  Jonathan Leffler May 28 '09 at 5:08
1  
So the suggestion is to close the ends of the pipe in the first process after the loop that does the forking, and before the loop that waits. These open ends are preventing the ctrl-D (EOF) that grep needs to finish. The danger ephemient mentions would occur if you were to have more than two commands, so more than one pipe. If you closed one pipe before creating the next one, the same fds would be re-used, causing problems. –  UncleO May 28 '09 at 19:35

You should have an error exit after execvp() - it will fail sometime.

exit(EXIT_FAILURE);

As @uncleo points out, the argument list must have a null pointer to indicate the end:

cmdArgs[aCount] = 0;

It is not clear to me that you let both programs run free - it appears that you require the first program in the pipeline to finish before starting the second, which is not a recipe for success if the first program blocks because the pipe is full.

share|improve this answer
    
I didn't add any type of error handling on purpose, no need to make the code even bigger for testing... Like I said above, doesn't strsep() handle that? The last argument will always be NULL cause strsep() does that himself. –  Ricardo Amaral May 27 '09 at 17:57
    
He's right about the running free. You fork off a process and wait for it to finish before forking off the next one. Perhaps grep is stalling with a filled pipe. –  UncleO May 27 '09 at 18:04
    
None of those suggestions solved the problem... I just tested everything and the same thing happens. –  Ricardo Amaral May 27 '09 at 18:39
    
@Nazgulled: I understand no error handling - but I'd still put an exit() after execvp(). Maybe you're safe enough - that makes sure. Also, your 'ls' listing is short enough that it shouldn't fill any pipe buffer - fortunately, you're testing in a small environment. I see that strsep() will give you a null - you're using do { } while (). –  Jonathan Leffler May 27 '09 at 19:02
    
Be aware that strsep() is not available everywhere - specifically, not on Solaris 10. –  Jonathan Leffler May 27 '09 at 19:05

Jonathan has the right idea. You rely on the first process to fork all the others. Each one has to run to completion before the next one is forked.

Instead, fork the processes in a loop like you are doing, but wait for them outside the inner loop, (at the bottom of the big loop for the shell prompt).

loop //for prompt
    next prompt
    loop //to fork tasks, store the pids
        if pid == 0 run command
        else store the pid
    end loop
    loop // on pids
        wait
    end loop
end loop
share|improve this answer
    
Didn't you just said that "I" was right in the comment above? It didn't felt you were talking to me saying that Jonathan was right but the other way around. Maybe I misinterpreted you... –  Ricardo Amaral May 27 '09 at 18:34
    
Just tested it and it didn't work... The same thing happens. –  Ricardo Amaral May 27 '09 at 18:38
    
I just updated the code in the question to reflect the changes suggested. –  Ricardo Amaral May 27 '09 at 19:24

I think your forked processes will continue executing.

Try either:

  • Changing it to 'return execvp'
  • Add 'exit(1);' after execvp
share|improve this answer
    
Hmm maybe not. But try it anyway =) Maybe make it 'return execvp' –  Kieveli May 27 '09 at 17:27
    
I don't think that will work. As far as I know execvp() replaces the current process (child process) by the executing command and so, if the execvp() call is successful, the child process will never reach any code line below that. –  Ricardo Amaral May 27 '09 at 17:32
    
Just tried and as I suspected, doesn't work: 1) "The exec() family of functions replaces the current process image with a new process image." 2) "If any of the exec() functions returns, an error will have occurred." Quotes from man page. –  Ricardo Amaral May 27 '09 at 17:39
    
Yeah, that's what I was thinking... but I did a search for execvp examples, and they all seem to have an 'exit(1);' afterwards. –  Kieveli May 27 '09 at 17:40
1  
exec*() never returns if it was successful, but will return if it failed. Thus a exit(1) following an exec*() is to handle failure (for whatever reason... file not found, no permission, etc.) –  ephemient May 27 '09 at 17:46

One potential problem is that cmdargs may have garbage at the end of it. You're supposed to terminate that array with a null pointer before passing it to execvp().

It looks like grep is accepting STDIN, though, so that might not be causing any problems (yet).

share|improve this answer
    
I believe strsep() deals with that, let's say the command is "cmd arg1 arg2", cmdArgs will be: cmdArgs[0] = "cmd"; cmdArgs[1] = "arg1"; cmdArgs[2] = "arg2"; cmdArgs[3] = NULL; –  Ricardo Amaral May 27 '09 at 17:46

the file descriptors from the pipe are reference counted, and incremented with each fork. for every fork, you have to issue a close on both descriptors in order to reduce the reference count to zero and allow the pipe to close. I'm guessing.

share|improve this answer
    
and also close in the parent process to reduce the reference count to zero, sorry. –  user431833 Aug 26 '10 at 12:33
1  
You do realize this question is more than 1 year old right? –  Ricardo Amaral Aug 26 '10 at 19:53

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