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I know pointers are 4 (or 8) bytes and they are preferred to copying/passing by value (for an example a 16byte struct/class). But i also heard if you are modifying the value it is better to pass by value because you can potentially elide the copy/construction.

But lets take the below. If we call doubleIt even if its elided the when calling doubleIt, it wont be when calling multiple? What about the return value? Will it be moved efficiently? What happens if theres 3 or 4 layers of functions to call before the class is actually modified?

MyClass multiple(MyClass a, int amount){
    a.memberA*=amount;
    //...
    a.memberZ*=amount;
    return a;
}
MyClass doubleIt(MyClass a){ return multiple(a, 2); }
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What you've done is reasonable if you need to return a result without modifying the argument. If your profiling shows there's a performance issue, then you'd want to create a constructor that takes a reference object and a multiplier and set the members directly to their final values. The Standard doesn't require optimisations, and exactly how this is handled would depend on the compiler and optimisation level. Re pointers prefered to by-value: use const references for non-modifiable parameters. Even in templates, it's rarely worth handling smaller types by value. –  Tony D Feb 7 '12 at 0:21
    
@Tony: my question is more about when i do want to modify the value. Here is a copy/paste to one of my comments "Lets say i call multiple directly. Technically if i made it const& i would have to construct the input and return class. If it was elided i would only need to construct one class which is why it is recommended. My question is about what happens when calling multiple functions." –  acidzombie24 Feb 7 '12 at 0:25
    
"My question is about what happens when calling multiple functions." - have you tried it? The answer will be compiler/optimisation specific, as I said above, so you need to get the answer for your compiler.... –  Tony D Feb 7 '12 at 0:38

1 Answer 1

But i also heard if you are modifying the value it is better to pass by value because you can potentially elide the copy/construction

No, it's the other way around. When you pass by value, the object is copied to the stack. When you pass by reference, the function you've passed it to gets a pointer/reference, to the exact same object.

it wont be when calling multiple?

This is pass by stack, not pass by reference. Yes, it will be copied.

What about the return value?

The exact same thing, it incurs a copy from the function to it's parent.

Will it be moved efficiently?

Meh, techically not but possibly by a compiler optimisation. The typical way to speed it up is to pass by ref to const, like this:

MyClass multiple(const MyClass& a, int amount) { }

const is used to keep the same behaviour as copy by value, meaning someone doesn't accidently change your object for you. If that is the intended behaviour, you would need to copy by reference, not over the stack anyway, or by the return value.

Also, you can't return a reference to an object declared in the function multiple because if the object goes out of scope, the reference you gave someone will become invalid.

What happens if theres 3 or 4 layers of functions to call before the class is actually modified?

Yes, lots of copying multiple times.

The best way to get what you want is to not have a return type and just modify the value by it's reference. Something like this:

void multiple(MyClass a&, int amount) { a.member *= amount; }

since passing by reference means that you manipulate and change the target object.

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1  
In the real world each one will probably be elided, or if not elided, moved. But the question is will it be elided through many function calls? That doesn't change the fact though that a copy is made when passing to the function though, and you're right in saying that passing by reference is better and more reliable. –  Seth Carnegie Feb 7 '12 at 0:12
    
Lets say i call multiple directly. Technically if i made it const& i would have to construct the input and return class. If it was elided i would only need to construct one class which is why it is recommended. My question is about what happens when calling multiple functions. –  acidzombie24 Feb 7 '12 at 0:21
    
It will probably be elided through many calls in general. However passing by reference is the proper way to tell the compiler and to indicate to other developers this is what you want to do. I said "in general" the optimisation would be made...in your code, that optimisation won't be made. You modify a inside multiple.. so the compiler has to copy it, because that's what copy-by-value implies. If the caller does this: c = multiple(a); c and a shouldn't point to each other because you say you want pass by value stack copying behaviour, so that is what you get. Does that make sense? –  Philluminati Feb 7 '12 at 0:23
    
If you used const& you dont have to construct the input and return. You've got pass by stack and by reference backwards. pass by stack means copy it, yes again and again through the stack. I doubt it would be optimised through multiple function calls as the stack has to "stack" it's arguments in memory sequentially. That means copy and copy and copy. A reference is one variable... pointing to a whole object. Passing a huge object (one that has lots of variables) through the stack like this will incur copying at every point. You can't rely on the compiler to make that optimisation. –  Philluminati Feb 7 '12 at 0:27
    
copying a reference is exactly the same...again and again and again.. only not the "object" is merely a single tiny 4 byte number, not a whole object. –  Philluminati Feb 7 '12 at 0:28

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