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Is there any difference between the run speeds of a constructor function when compared to an equivalent object initializer?

For example

function blueprint(var1, var2){
    this.property1 = var1;
    this.property2 = var2;
}

var object1 = new blueprint(value1,value2);

vs

object1 = {property1:value1, property2:value2};

If there is, is it relevant enough to be of concern when optimizing code or would file size take priority?

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You could test it at jsperf.com –  James Montagne Feb 7 '12 at 3:21
    
@JamesMontagne I wasn't aware that existed. Thanks, I'll have to bookmark that for future use. –  Aron Maguire Feb 7 '12 at 3:23
    
@nnnnnn Yeah, I noticed the typo and fixed it a couple minutes ago. –  Aron Maguire Feb 7 '12 at 3:37
    
The answer to questions like this will usually vary on the JavaScript implementation. Different implementations have different optimizations. –  squint Feb 7 '12 at 4:16

6 Answers 6

I think object intializer will be faster than using constructor because constructor has a function call and it has to maintain its own instance too.

As a side note, use constructor if you want to create multiple instances of similar objects other wise go for object initializer if only single object is required.

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If there is, is it relevant enough to be of concern when optimizing code or would file size take priority?

Neither.

It's extremely rare for decisions like this to have any (positive) effect on the system performance. Even if current browsers (or whatever your execution environment) show an observable advantage one way or another, that difference is not terribly likely to persist over new releases.

"It's much easier to optimize correct code than to correct optimized code."

Write readable, maintainable code and when it is all correct, check to see whether it is objectionably slow or the files are unreasonably large and make the optimizations.

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I'll be sure to keep that in mind, Malvolio. I'm still quite new to this so it's always great to get some advice like that. –  Aron Maguire Feb 7 '12 at 3:45

I wouldn't worry about it. The overhead of the constructor is an additional function call and a few extra properties to set (like the prototype). With modern JIT engines, it should hardly matter.

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Ran in console:

function blueprint(var1, var2){
    this.property1 = var1;
    this.property2 = var2;
}

var start = new Date();
var stop;
var object1;
for (var i = 0; i < 1000000; i++) {
    object1 = new blueprint(1,1);
}
stop = new Date();
console.log(stop - start);

Results...

 Google Chrome: 2832 milliseconds

Firefox 3.6.17: 3441 milliseconds

Ran in console:

var start = new Date();
var stop;
var object1;
for (var i = 0; i < 1000000; i++) {
    object1 = {
        'property1': 1,
        'property2': 1
    };
}
stop = new Date();
console.log(stop - start);

Results...

 Google Chrome: 2302 milliseconds

Firefox 3.6.17: 2285 milliseconds

Offhand, it's pretty obvious which one is faster. However, unless you are going through a significant amount of operations I think you should use whatever is more readable and not worry about it.

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Thanks, Pete. This is exactly what I was looking for. It's good to keep in mind for the future if I'm ever coding a plugin with a few thousand lines. –  Aron Maguire Feb 7 '12 at 3:41

Using a constructor to create a trivial object with just value properties is counter-productive. Just creating a simple object literal from scratch each time is faster. You can always define a function if it is to be called from lots of different places. Hey you just created a basic constructor function :lol:

If your object becomes non-trivial, for example including getters, setters, or full-blown methods, then a constructor (with the javascript in a prototype to be shared) is orders of magnitude faster than creating an object from scratch. Of course you are talking about a few micro-seconds (on a typical desktop) for creating an object with a small amount of embedded javascript vs less than a microsecond for calling a constructor, so in most cases it isn't important. Creating an object with only value properties is another order of magnitude faster.

Remember also that the initial creation of the constructor is an expensive operation, which may be more important if it is only to be used a few times. In some cases the constructor can be pre-compiled, for example if it is defined in a javascript code module in a Firefox addon, and then it is a win-win.

There are also more formal methods for creating objects such as the Object.create() function. However this is complicated and cumbersome to use and doesn't appear to be well optimised in any current browser. In all the tests I've run it is desperately slow compared to other methods, but might be useful when you need advanced capabilities and aren't going to be calling it hundreds of times.

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The constructor function is used for multiple entries under the same "object". The object initializer should only be used for a limited amount of entries, for example 3.

The constructor function is faster for multiple entries while the ... object initializer is faster for few entries, at least in theory, I have not tested the speeds because I doubt the difference is catastrophic.

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