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I'd like to be able to make code that looks like this:

30, 60, 90

And have it make a List<int> with those numbers in it. The problem is that in order to do this I believe I would need to be able to override how an int works within this scope. Is there any way that I could have my own "Int" class that could be used within a specific scope whenever a primitive constant like 30 was entered? If I'm unable to override int then the class must be used explicitly in this scope I'll end up with something like this:

Int(30),Int(60),Int(90)

Which is still less code than the standard way:

var nums = new List<int>(); nums.Add(30); nums.Add(60); nums.Add(90);

or even:

var nums = new List<int>{ 30, 60, 90 };

I'm playing around with my own scripting language, for education purposes only, not intended for anyone else to use. I'm trying to see how far I can simplify syntax to read closer to a natural language. Is something like in first code block at the top of this question possible? If this is possible, can I extend it to other primitive types?

EDIT: I want something that is pure C#, I'm not doing my own parsing, or writing my own compiler. I'm curious if somehow I can have a primitive type like a constant int be handled through my own type instead? I don't think it's possible, but if not at least StackOverflow is good at giving alternatives I might not have thought about.

Ok, here's what I've come up with so far to get me closer:

public static class Values
{
    static public List<int> Make(params int[] vals)
    {
        return vals.ToList();
    }
}

This lets me do something like:

var nums = Values.Make(30, 60, 90);

Of course, this isn't much shorter than var nums = new List<int>{ 30, 60, 90 }; but it lets me abstract the int away so they could also do:

var nums = Values.Make(30.0f, 60.0f, 90.0f);

So long as I make a handler for a list of floats. Unfortunately if I make a generic method, like this:

public static List<T> Make<T>(params T[] vals) where T : IComparable<T>
{
    return vals.ToList();
}

Then it make the syntax of using it longer:

var nums = Values.Make<float>(30.0f, 60.0f, 90.0f);
share|improve this question
    
it's difficult to understand what you are actually asking. Are you writing your own compiler? Modifying C# compiler? Are you referring to syntax of "your own scripting language" or C# syntax? –  Krizz Feb 7 '12 at 5:41
    
Are you looking for a collection initializer in C#, or implementing a parser? If you're implementing a parser, doesn't wrapping the items you want to collect in braces make sense, since that's mathematical set syntax anyway? –  Val Akkapeddi Feb 7 '12 at 5:43
    
I'll add more detail to the question. I want something that is pure C#, I'm not doing my own parsing, or writing my own compiler. I'm curious if somehow I can have a primitive type like a constant int be handled through my own type instead. I don't think it's possible, but if not at least SO is good at giving alternatives I might not have thought about. –  Nic Foster Feb 7 '12 at 5:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you're on C# 4.0 you can simplify it to:

var nums = new[] { 30, 60, 90 };

which will create an int[]. This can also be used with other types:

var floats = new[] { 30.0f, 60.0f, 90.0f };

If you really need a List<T> then you can do:

var nums = new[] { 30, 60, 90 }.ToList();
share|improve this answer

Smoak had the cleanest and most efficient way to implement the specific situation I was describing, but if you would like to see how you can actually override handling for basic primitive types, here's an example.

namespace ExtensionMethods
{
    public static class MyExtensions
    {
        // This lets you add new functionality to the primitive type 'int'
        // Allowing you to do (10).Add(5) to give you a List<int> with {10, 5}
        public static List<int> And( this int num, int other )
        {
            return new List<int> { num, other };
        }

        public static List<int> And( this List<int> num, int other )
        {            
            num.Add(other);
            return num;
        }
    }
}

// ===========================================================================
// And Program.cs
using ExtensionMethods;

namespace SyntaxTests
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main( string[] args )
        {            
            var nums = (30).And(60).And(90);

            nums.ForEach(n => Console.WriteLine(n + "\n"));
        }
    }
}

With output that looks like:

30

60

90

In addition to be less elegant than Smoak's answer, it is also less efficient, this line of code var nums = (30).And(60).And(90);, creates an int, then makes a list with two ints, then makes a list with three ints, whereas var nums = new[] {30, 60, 90}; just makes a list with three ints.

share|improve this answer
    
While I agree that your solution is not elegant and I would be against using it, it is efficient. Calling Add() on existing list should be pretty fast. –  svick Feb 7 '12 at 7:12
    
@svick: Calling Add() would be if doing something like (10) made a List<int>, but in my example (10) just allows you to use the . operator on a primitive int, which then allows for use of any extension methods you have created for that type, within the current namespace, like I did with Add(). –  Nic Foster Feb 7 '12 at 7:21

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