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I have some data in database:

id user 
1 zhangsan 
2 zhangsan 
3 zhangsan 
4 lisi 
5 lisi 
6 lisi 
7 zhangsan 
8 zhangsan 

I want keep order, and combine near same user items, how to do it? When I use shell script, I will(data in file test.):

cat test|cut -d " " -f2|uniq -c 

this will get result as:

   3 zhangsan 
   3 lisi 
   2 zhangsan 

But how to do it use sql?

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Shouldn't your result be 4 lisi? –  konsolenfreddy Feb 7 '12 at 6:43
    
You want to know how many count(id) of each user? –  Thit Lwin Oo Feb 7 '12 at 6:48
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6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you try:

SET @name:='',@num:=0;

SELECT id,
       @num:= if(@name = user, @num, @num + 1) as number,
       @name := user as user
FROM foo
ORDER BY id ASC;

This gives:

+------+--------+------+
| id   | number | user |
+------+--------+------+
|    1 |      1 | a    |
|    2 |      1 | a    |
|    3 |      1 | a    |
|    4 |      2 | b    |
|    5 |      2 | b    |
|    6 |      2 | b    |
|    7 |      3 | a    |
|    8 |      3 | a    |
+------+--------+------+

So then you can try:

SET @name:='',@num:=0;

SELECT COUNT(*) as count, user
FROM (
SELECT @num:= if(@name = user, @num, @num + 1) as number,
       @name := user as user
FROM foo
ORDER BY id ASC
) x
GROUP BY number;

Which gives

+-------+------+
| count | user |
+-------+------+
|     3 | a    |
|     3 | b    |
|     2 | a    |
+-------+------+

(I called my table foo and also just used names a and b because I was too lazy to write zhangsan and lisi over and over).

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Thanks, It work. –  Tinyfool Feb 7 '12 at 7:15
    
+1. My idea exactly, only I would have used FROM foo, (SELECT @name:='', @num:=0) instead of SET @name:='',@num:=0; –  flesk Feb 7 '12 at 7:16
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if in oracle, you can do like below.

SELECT NAME,
       num - lagnum
  FROM (SELECT lagname,
               NAME,
               num,
               nvl(lag(num) over(ORDER BY num), 0) lagnum
          FROM (SELECT id,
                       lag(NAME) over(ORDER BY ID) lagname,
                       NAME,
                       lead(NAME) over(ORDER BY ID) leadname,
                       ROWNUM num
                  FROM (SELECT * FROM test ORDER BY ID))
         WHERE (lagname = NAME AND (NAME <> leadname OR leadname IS NULL))
            OR (lagname IS NULL AND NAME <> leadname)
            OR (lagname <> NAME AND leadname IS NULL)
         ORDER BY ID);
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if in sql server, oracle, db2...

    with x as(  
select c.*, rn = row_number() over (order by c.id)
  from test c 
  left join test n
    on c.[user] = n.[user]
   and c.[id] + 1 = n.[id]   
 where n.id is null
)
select a.[user], a.id - coalesce(b.id, 0) 
  from x a
  left join x b
    on a.rn = b.rn + 1 
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I think what you are looking for is to COUNT(ID):

SELECT COUNT(ID) FROM table GROUP BY user
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2  
This gives global counts. The OP is after counts of contiguous usernames when ordered by ID (see how zanghsan appears twice). –  mathematical.coffee Feb 7 '12 at 6:50
    
Yep, good point. –  Blazes Feb 7 '12 at 6:52
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You cannot do this in sql without doing some sort of sequential (iterative) analysis. Remember sql is set operation language.

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A little improvement to the selected answer would be not to have to define those variables. So this query can be solved in just a single statement:

SELECT COUNT(*) cnt, user
FROM (
    SELECT @num := @num + (@name != user) as number,
           @name := user as user
    FROM t, (select @num := 0, @name := '') as s
    ORDER BY id
) x
GROUP BY number

Output:

| CNT |     USER |
|-----|----------|
|   3 | zhangsan |
|   3 |     lisi |
|   2 | zhangsan |

Fiddle here

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