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I get FIX message string (ASCII) as ByteBuffer. I parse tag value pairs and store values as primitive objects in the treemap with tag as key. So I need to convert byte[] value to int/double/date, etc. depending on its type.

Simplest way is to create new String and pass it to standard converter functions. e.g.

int convertToInt(byte[] buffer, int offset, int length)
{
  String valueStr = new String(buffer, offset, length);
  return Integer.parseInt(valueStr);
}

I understand that in Java, creating new object is very inexpensive, still is there any way to convert this ascii byte[] to primitive type directly. I tried hand written functions to do so, but found it to be time consuming and didn't result in better performance.

Are there any third party libraries for doing so and most of all is it worth doing?

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2  
measuring performance, i.e. micro benchmarks is hard and almost always got wrong. Stringifying is a bad idea if you need performance overall. You should use ByteBufefr.putInt instead. Other that that, hand written ByteBuffer parse would do, last if you use ByteBuffer do not convert to it byte[], it defeats the purpose of ByteBuffer, itself. –  bestsss Feb 7 '12 at 7:24
    
Thanks bestss, but it's ASCII ByteBuffer, not binary one, so can't use getInt, putInt. –  Mahendra Feb 7 '12 at 7:51
    
what do you call ASCII byteBuffer (there is no such class in standard jdk) –  bestsss Feb 7 '12 at 7:57

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

most of all is it worth doing?

Almost certainly not - and you should measure to check that this is a performance bottleneck before going to significant effort to alleviate it.

What's your performance like now? What does it need to be? ("As fast as possible" isn't a good goal, or you'll never stop - work out when you can say you're "done".)

Profile the code - is the problem really in string creation? Check how often you're garbage-collecting etc (again, with a profiler).

Each parsing type is likely to have different characteristics. For example, for parsing integers, if you find that for a significant amount of the time you've got a single digit, you might want to special-case that:

if (length == 1)
{
    char c = buffer[index];
    if (c >= '0' && c <= '9')
    {
        return c - '0';
    }
    // Invalid - throw an exception or whatever
}

... but check how often this occurs before you go down that path. Applying lots of checks for particular optimizations that never actually crop up is counter-productive.

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I agree with you Jon. I realized that it would be too much of efforts to gain single digit microsecond performance improvement. Profilers says that new String results in lot of minor collections. But I think, it would make more sense to profile parsing library in the context of application to get clearer picture. –  Mahendra Feb 7 '12 at 7:55
    
Currently it takes around 20 microseonds to create treemap out of 40+ tag value pairs. –  Mahendra Feb 7 '12 at 8:02

Agree with Jon however when processing many FIX messages this quickly adds up. The method below will allow for space padded numbers. If you need to handle decimals then code would be slightly different. Speed difference between the two methods is a factor of 11. The ConvertToLong results in 0 GCs. Code below is in c#:

///<summary>
///Converts a byte[] of characters that represent a number into a .net long type. Numbers can be padded from left
/// with spaces.
///</summary>
///<param name="buffer">The buffer containing the number as characters</param>
///<param name="startIndex">The startIndex of the number component</param>
///<param name="endIndex">The EndIndex of the number component</param>
///<returns>The price will be returned as a long from the ASCII characters</returns>
public static long ConvertToLong(this byte[] buffer, int startIndex, int endIndex)
{
    long result = 0;
    for (int i = startIndex; i <= endIndex; i++)
    {
        if (buffer[i] != 0x20)
        {
            // 48 is the decimal value of the '0' character. So to convert the char value
            // of an int to a number we subtract 48. e.g '1' = 49 -48 = 1
            result = result * 10 + (buffer[i] - 48);
        }
    }
    return result;
}

/// <summary>
/// Same as above but converting to string then to long
/// </summary>
public static long ConvertToLong2(this byte[] buffer, int startIndex, int endIndex)
{
    for (int i = startIndex; i <= endIndex; i++)
    {
        if (buffer[i] != SpaceChar)
        {
            return long.Parse(System.Text.Encoding.UTF8.GetString(buffer, i, (endIndex - i) + 1));
        }
    }
    return 0;
}

[Test]
public void TestPerformance(){
    const int iterations = 200 * 1000;
    const int testRuns = 10;
    const int warmUp = 10000;
    const string number = "    123400";
    byte[] buffer = System.Text.Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(number);

    double result = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < warmUp; i++){
        result = buffer.ConvertToLong(0, buffer.Length - 1);
    }
    for (int testRun = 0; testRun < testRuns; testRun++){
        Stopwatch sw = new Stopwatch();
        sw.Start();
        for (int i = 0; i < iterations; i++){
            result = buffer.ConvertToLong(0, buffer.Length - 1);
        }
        sw.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("Test {4}: {0} ticks, {1}ms, 1 conversion takes = {2}μs or {3}ns. GCs: {5}", sw.ElapsedTicks,
            sw.ElapsedMilliseconds, (((decimal) sw.ElapsedMilliseconds)/((decimal) iterations))*1000,
            (((decimal) sw.ElapsedMilliseconds)/((decimal) iterations))*1000*1000, testRun,
            GC.CollectionCount(0) + GC.CollectionCount(1) + GC.CollectionCount(2));
    }
}
RESULTS
ConvertToLong:
Test 0: 9243 ticks, 4ms, 1 conversion takes = 0.02000μs or 20.00000ns. GCs: 2
Test 1: 8339 ticks, 4ms, 1 conversion takes = 0.02000μs or 20.00000ns. GCs: 2
Test 2: 8425 ticks, 4ms, 1 conversion takes = 0.02000μs or 20.00000ns. GCs: 2
Test 3: 8333 ticks, 4ms, 1 conversion takes = 0.02000μs or 20.00000ns. GCs: 2
Test 4: 8332 ticks, 4ms, 1 conversion takes = 0.02000μs or 20.00000ns. GCs: 2
Test 5: 8331 ticks, 4ms, 1 conversion takes = 0.02000μs or 20.00000ns. GCs: 2
Test 6: 8409 ticks, 4ms, 1 conversion takes = 0.02000μs or 20.00000ns. GCs: 2
Test 7: 8334 ticks, 4ms, 1 conversion takes = 0.02000μs or 20.00000ns. GCs: 2
Test 8: 8335 ticks, 4ms, 1 conversion takes = 0.02000μs or 20.00000ns. GCs: 2
Test 9: 8331 ticks, 4ms, 1 conversion takes = 0.02000μs or 20.00000ns. GCs: 2
ConvertToLong2:
Test 0: 109067 ticks, 55ms, 1 conversion takes = 0.275000μs or 275.000000ns. GCs: 4
Test 1: 109861 ticks, 56ms, 1 conversion takes = 0.28000μs or 280.00000ns. GCs: 8
Test 2: 102888 ticks, 52ms, 1 conversion takes = 0.26000μs or 260.00000ns. GCs: 9
Test 3: 105164 ticks, 53ms, 1 conversion takes = 0.265000μs or 265.000000ns. GCs: 10
Test 4: 104083 ticks, 53ms, 1 conversion takes = 0.265000μs or 265.000000ns. GCs: 11
Test 5: 102756 ticks, 52ms, 1 conversion takes = 0.26000μs or 260.00000ns. GCs: 13
Test 6: 102219 ticks, 52ms, 1 conversion takes = 0.26000μs or 260.00000ns. GCs: 14
Test 7: 102086 ticks, 52ms, 1 conversion takes = 0.26000μs or 260.00000ns. GCs: 15
Test 8: 102672 ticks, 52ms, 1 conversion takes = 0.26000μs or 260.00000ns. GCs: 17
Test 9: 102025 ticks, 52ms, 1 conversion takes = 0.26000μs or 260.00000ns. GCs: 18
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Take a look at ByteBuffer. It has capabilities for doing this, including dealing with byte order (endianness).

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I don't think ByteBuffer has anything to parse text data, does it? –  Jon Skeet Feb 7 '12 at 7:38
    
@JonSkeet - No, but OP says "I need to convert byte[] value to int/double/date, etc." –  Ted Hopp Feb 7 '12 at 7:44
2  
Thanks Ted! It says byte[] containing ascii string. –  Mahendra Feb 7 '12 at 7:51

Generally I have no preference to paste such code but anyways, 100 lines how it's done (production code) I'd not advise using it but having some reference code it's nice (usually)

package t1;

import java.io.UnsupportedEncodingException;
import java.nio.ByteBuffer;

public class IntParser {
    final static byte[] digits = {
        '0' , '1' , '2' , '3' , '4' , '5' ,
        '6' , '7' , '8' , '9' , 'a' , 'b' ,
        'c' , 'd' , 'e' , 'f' , 'g' , 'h' ,
        'i' , 'j' , 'k' , 'l' , 'm' , 'n' ,
        'o' , 'p' , 'q' , 'r' , 's' , 't' ,
        'u' , 'v' , 'w' , 'x' , 'y' , 'z'
    };

    static boolean isDigit(byte b) {
    return b>='0' &&  b<='9';
  }

    static int digit(byte b){
        //negative = error

        int result  = b-'0';
        if (result>9)
            result = -1;
        return result;
    }

    static NumberFormatException forInputString(ByteBuffer b){
        byte[] bytes=new byte[b.remaining()];
        b.get(bytes);
        try {
            return new NumberFormatException("bad integer: "+new String(bytes, "8859_1"));
        } catch (UnsupportedEncodingException e) {
            throw new RuntimeException(e);
        }
    }
    public static int parseInt(ByteBuffer b){
        return parseInt(b, 10, b.position(), b.limit());
    }
    public static int parseInt(ByteBuffer b, int radix, int i, int max) throws NumberFormatException{
        int result = 0;
        boolean negative = false;


        int limit;
        int multmin;
        int digit;      

        if (max > i) {
            if (b.get(i) == '-') {
                negative = true;
                limit = Integer.MIN_VALUE;
                i++;
            } else {
                limit = -Integer.MAX_VALUE;
            }
            multmin = limit / radix;
            if (i < max) {
                digit = digit(b.get(i++));
                if (digit < 0) {
                    throw forInputString(b);
                } else {
                    result = -digit;
                }
            }
            while (i < max) {
                // Accumulating negatively avoids surprises near MAX_VALUE
                digit = digit(b.get(i++));
                if (digit < 0) {
                    throw forInputString(b);
                }
                if (result < multmin) {
                    throw forInputString(b);
                }
                result *= radix;
                if (result < limit + digit) {
                    throw forInputString(b);
                }
                result -= digit;
            }
        } else {
            throw forInputString(b);
        }
        if (negative) {
            if (i > b.position()+1) {
                return result;
            } else {    /* Only got "-" */
                throw forInputString(b);
            }
        } else {
            return -result;
        }
    }

}
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