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let ans = stringConcat ["<a href=","\"",str,"\"",">",strr,"</a>"]
                putStr ("\nOutput :" ++show (ans))

when I print this answer is Output :"<a href=\"www.test.com\">testing</a>" I want to know why the extra \ is printing. \" suppose to be the escape code for double quotes. yet again it prints both \". I want to know why this happening and is there any way to put a " is side a string..?

concat function

stringConcat::[String]->String 
stringConcat xs= concat xs 
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2  
You don't need special stringConcat version for string. concat could be used directly. –  Matvey Aksenov Feb 7 '12 at 9:35

3 Answers 3

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Yes, \" is the correct escape code for double quotes, so the string ans contains the double quotes as you expected.

The problem is that you're then using show, which is a function for showing values like they would appear in Haskell code, which means that strings with double quotes in them have to be escaped.

> putStrLn (show "I said \"hello\".")
"I said \"hello\"."

So if you don't want that, just don't use show:

> putStrLn "I said \"hello\"."
I said "hello".
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What's weird is that the escaping works for a single quote when using show \' just not for \". –  bshields Jun 8 '13 at 16:45
    
Sorry I didn't actually write samples. What I'm seeing is that the escaping works as expected for a single quote but not for a double quote. Typing "\"" at the ghci prompt yields "\"", but "\'" yields "'" –  bshields Jun 8 '13 at 16:55
    
Ahh I see, thanks for the clarification. –  bshields Jun 8 '13 at 16:57
    
@bshields: That's because there is no need to escape a single quote in a string, so it doesn't. Whether you escaped it anyway when you entered it doesn't make any difference. That was taken care of when your expression was parsed, long before show was even run. All it sees is a list of characters, which it will format according to its own rules –  hammar Jun 8 '13 at 16:57

Don't show a String.

let ans = stringConcat ["<a href=","\"",str,"\"",">",strr,"</a>"]
putStr ("\nOutput :" ++ ans)

Also, what is stringConcat?

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Got it... stringConcat is concat function –  Gihan Feb 7 '12 at 10:01

why don't you try this

let ans = stringConcat ["<a href=","'",str,"'",">",strr,"</a>"]
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1  
I need double quotes not single –  Gihan Feb 7 '12 at 10:00

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