Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Few days back i had an interview but, still I am searching for the answer. I would like to understand the significance of using volatile keyword.

Find the code below: Two different scenario.

//project1
//File1.c

int abc;//Global variable
/*And this variable is getting used in some other files too.*/
if(abc == 3) //Say
{
  printf("abc == 3");
}
else
{
  printf("abc != 3");
}
/*So if or else part will not be optimized 
because "abc" can not be predicted, 
the value can chage at any point of time */




//Project2
//file1.c

volatile int abc;//Global variable with volatile keyword

/*And this variable is getting used in some other files too.*/

if(abc == 3) //Say
{
  printf("abc == 3");
}
else
{
  printf("abc != 3");
}
/*So if or else part will not be optimized 
because "abc" can not be predicted as it is declared as volatile,
the value can chage at any point of time */

Why we should use volatile keyword instead?

share|improve this question
    
5  
volatile and extern are completely unrelated. –  Mark Byers Feb 7 '12 at 9:07
    
@MarkByers: You are right, but according to the interviewer's question both of the above serves same. So why volatile? –  Rasmi Ranjan Nayak Feb 7 '12 at 9:12
3  
@Rasmi: maybe so you can tell him they're unrelated? Extern simply allows a variable to be accessed from code that happens to have been compiled in different translation units / objects then linked. It doesn't cause any different runtime use of the variable compared to a similar non-extern variable. volatile means the compiler shouldn't cache the value in a CPU register any longer than necessary to perform some change to it - it should instead generate read and write instructions to and from memory. But that memory can still be core-specific cache, so it's no guarantee of thread safety. –  Tony D Feb 7 '12 at 9:19
2  
@TonyDelroy dont you think you should write answer from your comment....!!! –  Mr.32 Feb 7 '12 at 9:30
show 1 more comment

4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

As Tony Delroy explained in its comment, extern and volatile are quite different.


Volatile keyword protects your variable from being aggressively optimised. An optimised variable can be invisible to other threads and never reach main memory. Sometimes, compiler can even squeeze entirely a variable if it's not needed. Compiler base its guess with your source code as its only input. Sometimes, there is some external events which can change your variable value. It could be an hardware device or an other process, for instance.

=> Concretely, compiler disables some optimisations to this variable, so it can behave as you want it to.


Extern is not about cache vs memory. Extern is just about accessing a variable which lives in an other object files. See this short example of what kind of assembly code is generated for an extern access. Those extern variables are optimised in their own object file as far as it's possible. There's no question about to protect it or not.

=> Concretely, compiler indicates an external reference needing to be solved at link time

share|improve this answer
    
Frame pointers and extern are unrelated. Frame pointers are used for stack variables (automatic storage class), extern are global (static storage class) and do not need any frame pointer. –  Suma Feb 7 '12 at 10:21
    
damn, i have re-cheched and you're right. I'll remove this part of my answer –  Coren Feb 7 '12 at 10:29
1  
The explanation of extern is confusing. –  Atom Feb 7 '12 at 10:31
    
@Coren: Could you please explain it little more... –  Rasmi Ranjan Nayak Feb 7 '12 at 10:34
    
@Coren: "and/or being put in a cache" - it may still be stuck in a cache (i.e. not reaching main memory or visible to other cores/CPUs), but won't simply be stuck inside a CPU register. –  Tony D Feb 9 '12 at 0:16
show 1 more comment

volatile in declaration or prototype say always load/store value from/to memory regardless local, static or extern this vlaue (but in case of local it is not always meaningful).

Also using volatile keyword in regular source are untypically. It is useful only for hardware which map hardware registers to memory (like in ARM architecture), in special cases of kernel/driver development.

If you use volatile in GUI or ecommerce code you probably wrong...

share|improve this answer
    
The question is tagged as embedded, where volatile is very typical. Volatile in automatic (local) variables is meaningful, for example as loop counters for delay implementation: for (volatile unsigned int i = delay; i > 0 ; --i) {}. Since the loop does nothing logical, an optimizer could remove it if it wasn't for volatile. –  Gauthier Feb 9 '12 at 10:53
    
It is also useful for creating e.g. a debug variable, where you can write to a variable that the program never reads, and intend to read the content later in a debugger. static volatile uint8_t debug_buffer[64]; Since the compiler sees that the values saved are never reused, it could just as well remove the write. volatile prevents that. –  Gauthier Feb 9 '12 at 10:59
    
@Gauthier Thanks in advice! I remember that some embedded platform allow stop execution on memory access to certain address so you can easily trace any variable value changes without loosing execution performance by marking it as volataile. –  gavenkoa Feb 9 '12 at 11:23
add comment

volatile usually means one or more of the following:

  1. The variable may get changed by another OS thread
  2. The normal flow of execution in the program may be interrupted by a signal and the signal handler might change the variable
  3. The normal flow of execution is running a loop, the variable is being read within the loop, and the variable is changed by means of point 1 or 2

volatile means that throughout the lifetime of the program there are two (or more) reads R1 and R2 of the variable, and some other event happening inbetween R1 and R2 will change the variable outside of the normal flow of execution.


extern means that the variable has been defined somewhere elsewhere and that the program is reusing that definition.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Essentially, volatile is used to indicate that a variable's value will be modified by different threads.

Declaring a volatile Java variable means:

The value of this variable will never be cached thread-locally: all reads and writes will go straight to "main memory";
Access to the variable acts as though it is enclosed in a synchronized block, synchronized on itself. 

Extern essentially means that all modules can use the defined variable.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.