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i am creating a small scala DSL and running into the following problem to which i dont really have a solution. A small conceptual example of what i want to achieve:

(Compute
 write "hello"
 read 'name
 calc()
 calc()
 write "hello" + 'name
)

the code defining this dsl is roughly this:

Object Compute extends Compute{
  ...
 implicit def str2Message:Message = ...
}
class Compute{
 def write(msg:Message):Compute = ...
 def read(s:Symbol):Compute = ...
 def calc():Compute = { ... }
}

Now the question: how can i get rid of these parenthesis after calc? is it possible? if so, how? just omitting them in the definition does not help because of compilation errors.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

ok, i think, i found an acceptable solution... i now achieved this possible syntax

 | write "hello"
 | read 'name
 | calc
 | calc
 | write "hello " + 'name 

using an object named "|", i am able to write nearly the dsl i wanted. normaly, a ";" is needed after calc if its parameterless. The trick here is to accept the DSL-object itself (here, its the "|" on the next line). making this parameter implicit also allows calc as a last statement in this code. well, looks like it is definitly not possible to have it the way i want, but this is ok too

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Yay! Tricky! ))) –  noncom Sep 11 '12 at 8:47

It's not possible to get rid of the parenthesis, but you can replace it. For example:

object it

class Compute {
 def calc(x: it.type):Compute = { ... }

(Compute
 write "hello"
 read 'name
 calc it
 calc it
 write "hello" + 'name
)

To expand a bit, whenever Scala sees something like this:

object method
non-reserved-word

It assumes it means object.method(non-reserved-word). Conversely, whenever it sees something like this:

object method object
method2 object2

It assumes these are two independent statements, as in object.method(object); method2.object, expecting method2 to be a new object, and object2 a method.

These assumptions are part of Scala grammar: it is meant to be this way on purpose.

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i just came to a similar solution (having calc take a parameter) as i wrote just at this moment (see my answer). i also tried several other ways like a case class or a static method call, but it seems, that this is the only way –  wrm Feb 7 '12 at 18:12
    
If you have some time, could you please write why this is impossible to get rid of the parenthesis? –  brainless Sep 5 '13 at 13:37
    
And another question is about parentheses which round all expression, can we avoid them and how? –  brainless Sep 5 '13 at 13:47
1  
@brainless Done. –  Daniel C. Sobral Sep 5 '13 at 19:57

First try to remove the parentheses from the definition of calc. Second try to use curly braces around the whole instead of parentheses. Curly braces and parentheses doesn't mean the same and I find that parenthesis works best in single line code (unless using semi-colons). See also What is the formal difference in Scala between braces and parentheses, and when should they be used?

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1  
there is a reason for using parantheses here. methodchaining does not really work with newlines, except if its surrounded by "()" because then scala knows, its only one statement. doesnt work with "{}". leaving the parantheses of the calc def doesnt work either because then, syntactic scala sugar is not working anymore and i cannot chain-call another method –  wrm Feb 7 '12 at 10:01
    
Ah.. right I was thinking the other way around. What compilation errors do you get? Can you condense your example to be runnable? –  thoredge Feb 7 '12 at 11:55
    
it marks the last line and says: - missing arguments for method write in class Compute; follow this method with '_' if you want to treat it as a partially applied function - ')' expected but symbol literal found. the problem here is that the normal conversion from x.y(p1).z(p2) to x y p1 z p2 does not work, because its more like x.y.z(p2) which cannot be converted to sugar evidently. there are other ways than using method chaining to achieve something similar but i cant find one working way to achieve THIS syntax... –  wrm Feb 7 '12 at 12:39

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