Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to fill in a combobox on my winform app from the database. I know there is info in the DB. I know the SP works. It returns the correct ColumnNames. But the DataSet itself is empty? Help!?!?

Call from my form-->

cboDiagnosisDescription.Properties.DataSource = myDiagnosis.RetrieveDiagnosisCodes();

The RetrieveDiagnosisCodes -->

public DataSet RetrieveDiagnosisCodes()
    {
        string tableName = "tblDiagnosisCues";
        string strSQL = null;
        DataSet ds = new DataSet(tableName);
        SqlConnection cnn = new SqlConnection(Settings.Default.CMOSQLConn);
        //strSQL = "select * from " & tableName & " where effectivedate <= getdate() and (termdate >= getdate() or termdate is null)"
        strSQL = "select tblDiagnosisCues.*, tblDiagnosisCategory.Description as CategoryDesc, tblDiagnosisSubCategory.Description as SubCategoryDesc " + "FROM dbo.tblDiagnosisCategory INNER JOIN " + "dbo.tblDiagnosisSubCategory ON dbo.tblDiagnosisCategory.Category = dbo.tblDiagnosisSubCategory.Category INNER JOIN " + "dbo.tblDiagnosisCues ON dbo.tblDiagnosisSubCategory.SubCategory = dbo.tblDiagnosisCues.SubCategoryID " + "where effectivedate <= getdate() and (termdate >= getdate() or termdate is null) order by tblDiagnosisCues.Description";
        SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand(strSQL, cnn) {CommandType = CommandType.Text};
        SqlDataAdapter da = new SqlDataAdapter(cmd);
        try
        {
            //cnn.Open();
            da.Fill(ds);
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            throw;
        }
        finally
        {
            cmd.Dispose();
            da.Dispose();
            //ds.Dispose();
            cnn.Close();
            cnn.Dispose();
        }
        return ds;
    }

The reason I know it is returning the correct column names is that I tried the following with a DevExpress LookUpEdit box and it populates the correct columns from the DB -->

            var myDiagnosis = new Diagnosis();
        var ds = myDiagnosis.RetrieveDiagnosisCodes();
        lkuDiagnosis.Properties.DataSource = ds;
        lkuDiagnosis.Properties.PopulateColumns();
        lkuDiagnosis.Properties.DisplayMember = ds.Tables[0].Columns[1].ColumnName;
        lkuDiagnosis.Properties.ValueMember = ds.Tables[0].Columns[0].ColumnName;

Ideas? Mainly, I don't even know how to proceed tracking this down...How to debug it?

EDIT 1

Based on a comment I ran the following SQL by itself and it returned 650 results...

select tblDiagnosisCues.*, 
	tblDiagnosisCategory.Description as CategoryDesc,	
	tblDiagnosisSubCategory.Description as SubCategoryDesc 
FROM dbo.tblDiagnosisCategory 
    INNER JOIN dbo.tblDiagnosisSubCategory 
    ON dbo.tblDiagnosisCategory.Category = dbo.tblDiagnosisSubCategory.Category 
    	INNER JOIN dbo.tblDiagnosisCues ON dbo.tblDiagnosisSubCategory.SubCategory = dbo.tblDiagnosisCues.SubCategoryID 
where effectivedate <= getdate() and (termdate >= getdate() or termdate is null) order by tblDiagnosisCues.Description
share|improve this question
1  
//ds.Dispose(); –  dotjoe May 27 '09 at 18:53
    
@dotjoe: thanks –  Refracted Paladin May 27 '09 at 18:56
2  
try that SELECT query interactively, e.g with osql -- that query has a lot of conditions, maybe you're expressing some of them badly and getting 0 rows as a result; if so then osql and similar tools lets you look at what happen when you weaken some condition, &c. –  Alex Martelli May 27 '09 at 19:42

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

//cnn.open();

...

//ds.dispose();

There is no need to specify a table name in the dataset constructor. The fill method will add a table. Also no need to open the connection since the sqldataadapter will open and close the connection for you. Also, I prefer to return a datatable as opposed to dataset with one table.

The code could be refactored to the following...of coure add the try catch if you want to log the exception.

public DataTable RetrieveDiagnosisCodes()
{
    //string tableName = "tblDiagnosisCues";
    DataSet ds = new DataSet();
    Datatable dt = null;
    //strSQL = "select * from " & tableName & " where effectivedate <= getdate() and (termdate >= getdate() or termdate is null)"
    string strSQL = "select tblDiagnosisCues.*, tblDiagnosisCategory.Description as CategoryDesc, tblDiagnosisSubCategory.Description as SubCategoryDesc " + "FROM dbo.tblDiagnosisCategory INNER JOIN " + "dbo.tblDiagnosisSubCategory ON dbo.tblDiagnosisCategory.Category = dbo.tblDiagnosisSubCategory.Category INNER JOIN " + "dbo.tblDiagnosisCues ON dbo.tblDiagnosisSubCategory.SubCategory = dbo.tblDiagnosisCues.SubCategoryID " + "where effectivedate <= getdate() and (termdate >= getdate() or termdate is null) order by tblDiagnosisCues.Description";

    using(SqlDataAdapter da = new SqlDataAdapter(strSQL, Settings.Default.CMOSQLConn))
    {
      da.Fill(ds);
    }
    if (ds.Tables.Count > 0)
    {
      dt = ds.Tables[0];
    }

    return dt;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Are these General Tips for Best Practice? or a possible Solution? Thank You –  Refracted Paladin May 27 '09 at 19:03
    
Good catch...! +1 –  Cerebrus May 27 '09 at 19:04
1  
@Mr_Mom Yes. Looking over the code again, the finally block executes regardless of success or failure. And the ds.dispose command is effectively flushing out all the data you just downloaded. I would agree that returning the datatable would be a better route to go. Just change "return ds" to "return ds.Tables[0]" –  Dillie-O May 27 '09 at 19:30
1  
I think you could use a dataset...but then you would need to set the value member and display member as "tablename.columnname" instead of just "columnname". By using a datatable your just saving the binding from having to find the table inside the dataset. –  dotjoe May 27 '09 at 20:19
2  
A DataSet is a collection of tables, relationships, keys, etc. It is a lot like a portable database, all setup for a convenient "disconnected" data model to work with. Most of the objects in the .NET framework can not databind by default to such a complex object. The DataTable, however, is a single entity (albeit with columns and rows) that most of the objects know how to bind to with little difficulty, you just have to specify the column you wish to refer to. –  Dillie-O May 27 '09 at 21:07

If the data is properly binding to another control, it indicates that there is an issue with the databinding process. What does your databinding setup look like for the combobox in question? Are all the column names properly spelled and setup?

share|improve this answer
    
I wasn't databinding... :( I just set the datasource and then specify the Display and Value Member. Is that my problem? –  Refracted Paladin May 27 '09 at 18:56
1  
No, setting up your data source was the "databinding" process. There is no need to explicitly call a databind method like in asp.net, but it sounds like you're on the path to the right solution. –  Dillie-O May 27 '09 at 19:29

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.