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i am trying to initialize vectors to contain 13 elements each in class constructor.

Since in the following case compiler gives " syntax error : 'constant' " .

#include <vector>
using namespace System;  
public ref class MyClass {
public :
      vector<int> vector1D(13) ;     //  Syntax error : 'constant'
      vector<vector<int>> vector2D(13,vector<int>(13)) ;

};

Then how can the vector be initialized to contain 13 elements in constructor ?

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4 Answers 4

Non-static members have to be initialised in the constructor definition, not the member declaration:

class MyClass {
public :
      vector<int> vector1D;
      vector<vector<int>> vector2D;

      MyClass() : 
          vector1D(13),
          vector2D(13,vector<int>(13))
      {}
};
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in this case it may not be the suitable syntax. Compiler gives a new error : MyClass : mixed types are not supported –  eliz Feb 7 '12 at 10:06
    
@eliz: I'm guessing that's something to do with Managed C++, and I don't know anything about that. This is how you'd initialise them in standard C++; according to Dialecticus' answer, you might need to use some weird non-standard array type instead of vector. –  Mike Seymour Feb 7 '12 at 10:14
    
anyway i will change the class not to use array –  eliz Feb 7 '12 at 10:23

You need to do it in the constructor:

class MyClass {
public :
    vector<int> vector1D;
    vector< vector<int> > vector2D;

    MyClass()
    {
        vector1D = vector<int>(13);
        vector2D = vector< vector<int> > (13, vector<int>(13));
    }
};
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You can't reserve room for 13 elements in the constructor. Use vector::reserve for that.

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You can initialise it to contain 13 elements in the constructor, though. –  Mike Seymour Feb 7 '12 at 9:56
    
Thanks for the clarification. Yes, if you know at construction time what the 13 elements are. I don't see that in the OP's code. –  Mr Lister Feb 7 '12 at 10:02
    
The OP's code is trying to initialise it with 13 value-initialised values, using the constructor that does exactly that. The only problem is that it needs to be done in the constructor definition, not the member declaration. –  Mike Seymour Feb 7 '12 at 10:09

If MyClass is managed class then it cannot have unmanaged members.

#using <mscorlib.dll>
#include <vector>

using namespace System;

public ref class MyClass {
public :
    cli::array<int>^ vector1D;
    cli::array<cli::array<int>^>^ vector2D;
    MyClass()
    {
        Array::Resize(vector1D, 13);
        Array::Resize(vector2D, 13);

        for each (cli::array<int>^ item in vector2D)
            Array::Resize(item, 13);
    }
};
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Array is ok but it must be vector in here –  eliz Feb 7 '12 at 10:17
    
Then MyClass cannot be ref. –  Dialecticus Feb 7 '12 at 11:05

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