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I have seen this question on SO:

What are the most common font-sizes for H1-H6 tags with this being the recommended font sizes fo H tags:

h1 { font-size: 2em; }
h2 { font-size: 1.5em; }
h3 { font-size: 1.17em; }
h5 { font-size: .83em; }
h6 { font-size: .75em; }

Is there a 'best practice' for these for mobile phones? -say iphone screen size?

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3  
With what base to em, 16px? –  Florian Rachor Feb 7 '12 at 10:35
    
The only recommendation I can give is that yes, ems are the way to go, not pixels as the other question suggests. But it depends. For instance if the text in a h1 is large (like, an entire sentence) I find 2em a bit too overwhelming and I'd go with a smaller size. –  Mr Lister Feb 7 '12 at 10:40
3  
Well you know that em is a relative measure right? So 1em without a base means nothing. –  Florian Rachor Feb 7 '12 at 10:42
    
@FlorianRachor Not true, sorry. –  Mr Lister Feb 7 '12 at 11:03

2 Answers 2

up vote 16 down vote accepted

The font sizes in your question are an example of what ratio each header should be in comparison to each other, rather than what size they should be themselves (in pixels).

So in response to your question "Is there a 'best practice' for these for mobile phones? - say iphone screen size?", yes there probably is - but you might find what someone says is "best practice" does not work for your layout.

However, to help get you on the right track, this article about building responsive layouts provides a good example of how to calculate the base font-size in pixels in relation to device screen sizes.

The suggested font-sizes for screen resolutions suggested from that article are as follows:

@media (min-width: 858px) {
    html {
        font-size: 12px;
    }
}

@media (min-width: 780px) {
    html {
        font-size: 11px;
    }
}

@media (min-width: 702px) {
    html {
        font-size: 10px;
    }
}

@media (min-width: 724px) {
    html {
        font-size: 9px;
    }
}

@media (max-width: 623px) {
    html {
        font-size: 8px;
    }
}
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1  
it says use rem instead of em. em inherits from parent, while rem is directly from html..as can be seen here in the fiddle i made jsfiddle.net/5qb4x –  Muhammad Umer Aug 16 '13 at 20:55
1  
I would rather say that going under 12px is already bad. Well, even 8px is readable, but it's not as easy to read as 12px or similar. User should see text in the size, that will give him chance to read text without scaling or holding phone closer to eyes. Content is this what customers looking for on our website, not white background with small letters ;) –  instead May 6 at 23:20

The whole thing to em is, that the size is relative to the base. So I would say you could keep the font sizes by altering the base.

Example: If you base is 16px, and p is .75em (which is 12px) you would have to raise the base to about 20px. In this case p would then equal about 15px which is the minimum I personally require for mobile phones.

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1  
But this isn't about base font size. If it was, I'd say make it depend on the screen width. You know, with an @media rule. This is about the header-to-normal ratio, and then you can't do better than use ems. –  Mr Lister Feb 7 '12 at 10:42
    
Sorry but you disagree with yourself. "Header-to-normal ratio" - well what is the normal size? Exactly the base, which is measured in px, because the media consists of pixels. If you want to use em, you have to set a base (16px is standard in most browsers). –  Florian Rachor Feb 7 '12 at 10:50
    
You don't understand the question then. The question isn't about what the best, let's say, body size is. It's about the size of headers, relative to the normal size. And em is not relative to some undefined size that you have to set first, it's relative to the size in the parent (body in this case). If you don't set a size for the body, the browser will use its default. So it will always be known to the browser how large an em is in pixels, even if you don't force a base size on the user. –  Mr Lister Feb 7 '12 at 11:02
1  
I'm sorry but I keep the feeling you don't understand the em concept. You basically write the same thing as I but keep telling me I'm wrong. If you don't set a size the browser will use 16px. If the h1-h6 sizes are best p/h ratio on screen, it's most likely the best for a mobile phone. You just adjust the base according to the media. The whole thing about em is relative size to a base. So you change the base and not the ratio. –  Florian Rachor Feb 7 '12 at 11:10
    
It seems the question is exactly about your "most likely" part. –  Jan Pöschko Feb 7 '12 at 11:23

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