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I'm implementing a TCP socket server in C and Linux. It will be a chat server handling many requests simultaneously. Here is the pseudo code for how it is setup

create a socket
bind to a well-known port
use listen to place in passive mode
while (1)
{
    accept a client connection
    fork
    if (child)
    {
        communicate with new socket
        close new socket
        exit
     }
 else
 {close new socket}
}

From what I've seen, the "communicate with new socket" part consists of reading the buffer and then possibly writing to the buffer, then the socket closes. I thought sockets were suppose to be a persistent connection? If the client has to reconnect every time it wants to send more data to the server, isn't this inefficient and defeating the purpose of sockets?

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1  
Is that your homework? –  Tadeusz A. Kadłubowski Feb 7 '12 at 10:36
1  
You should be using an event library such as libevent or libev. –  Per Johansson Feb 7 '12 at 11:42
    
You don't need to fork for every client. You very probably need an event loop around a multiplexing syscall like select or poll (or a library with an event loop, like libev or libevent or something else; and that library would do the multiplexing). –  Basile Starynkevitch Feb 7 '12 at 12:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
  1. Don't close the socket. Put the code which receives and responds to the messages in a loop and using blocking I/O ( the default ) to block on reading the socket until a request arrives. This way you'll have a forked process dealing with each client and using minimal resources. You only close the socket and exit the child process when the client explicitly closes the connection because it's done.

  2. Use UDP instead of TCP. This way there is no "connection" between the server and the client. You multiplex multiple clients to a single socket without forking. If you care about reliability you'd need to add a sequence number to each message to keep them straight and allow retransmission on failures.

  3. Keep a single process using TCP, but store a socket descriptor set and use select to check for readable sockets. You can then retransmit that data on each or some of the other client sockets.

I'd point out that forking a child for each client in a chat server seems like a poor implementation. How do two people who want to chat communicate? Each one will be served by a separate process - how do the processes communicate with each other so that chat data can pass between clients?

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"If you care about reliability you'd need to add a sequence number to each message to keep them straight and allow retransmission on failures." <- This is called TCP... –  m0skit0 Feb 7 '12 at 10:58
    
2. If you need reliability don't even think about using UDP unless you have very good reasons to do so (there are some use cases, but that's quite advanced level) –  Karoly Horvath Feb 7 '12 at 10:59
    
UDP is used when in need of a lot of speed and no real identification, for example a server managing clients that share a multiplayer game. If you use TCP you'll have a slow packet flow and thus a bad reaction speed. UDP is good for broadcasting info –  Eregrith Feb 7 '12 at 11:13
    
There are numerous uses for reliable UDP ( take a look at the SCTP protocol ), although I would agree that a simple chat server probably isn't one of them. I would most likely recommend 3 as the way to do a chat server, but I don't know enough about his requirements to say for sure. –  Robert S. Barnes Feb 7 '12 at 11:15
    
Thanks guys, this has been very helpful! I think I can get it working now with all of this great info. –  Josh Brittain Feb 7 '12 at 21:16

If the client has to reconnect every time it wants to send more data to the server, isn't this inefficient and defeating the purpose of sockets?

It's impossible to say without knowing more about the nature of your application:

  • In some cases, it makes sense to maintain a persistent connection for the duration of the client's lifetime.

  • In other cases, connecting on every message would also work well.

You are quite right on the efficiency front: there is quite a lot of overhead involved in establishing a TCP connection. Therefore, if the messages are frequent it may turn out to be very costly to set up a new connection for each message.

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