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I have a column, which stores a 4 character long string with 4 or less wild characters (for eg. ????, ??01', 0??1 etc). For each such string like 0??1 I have to insert into another table values 0001 to 0991; for the string ??01, values will be be 0001 to 9901; for string ???? values will be 0000 to 9999 and so on.

How could I accomplish this using PL/SQL and string functions?

EDIT

The current code is:

declare 

  v_rule varchar2(50) := '????52132'; 
  v_cc varchar2(50); 
  v_nat varchar2(50); 
  v_wild number; 
  n number; 

begin 

  v_cc := substr(v_rule,1,4); 
  v_nat := substr(v_rule,5); 

  dbms_output.put_line (v_cc || ' '|| v_nat); 

  if instr(v_cc, '????') <> 0 then 
    v_wild := 4; 
  end if; 

  n := power(10,v_wild); 

  for i in 0 .. n - 1 loop 
    dbms_output.put_line(substr(lpad(to_char(i),v_wild,'0' ),0,4)); 
  end loop; 

end;
/
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Would something like the following help?

BEGIN
  FOR source_row IN (SELECT rule FROM some_table)
  LOOP
    INSERT INTO some_other_table (rule_match)
      WITH numbers AS (SELECT LPAD(LEVEL - 1, 4, '0') AS num FROM DUAL CONNECT BY LEVEL <= 10000)
      SELECT num FROM numbers WHERE num LIKE REPLACE(source_row.rule, '?', '_');
  END LOOP;
END;
/

This assumes you have a table called some_table with a column rule, which contains text such as ??01, 0??1 and ????. It inserts into some_other_table all numbers from 0000 to 9999 that match these wild-carded patterns.

The subquery

SELECT LPAD(LEVEL - 1, 4, '0') AS num FROM DUAL CONNECT BY LEVEL <= 10000)

generates all numbers in the range 0000 to 9999. We then filter out from this list of numbers any that match this pattern, using LIKE. Note that _ is the single-character wildcard when using LIKE, not ?.

I set this up with the following data:

CREATE TABLE some_table (rule VARCHAR2(4));

INSERT INTO some_table (rule) VALUES ('??01');
INSERT INTO some_table (rule) VALUES ('0??1');
INSERT INTO some_table (rule) VALUES ('????');
COMMIT;

CREATE TABLE some_other_table (rule_match VARCHAR2(4));

After running the above PL/SQL block, the table some_other_table had 10200 rows in it, all the numbers that matched all three of the patterns given.

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Awesome!! It fitted my problem perfectly. Thanks for the reply or else I would have had a tough time dealing with instring and substring :) –  Arcs Feb 8 '12 at 16:22
    
There is one more thing I wanted to ask. 'some_table' has 10 million records. Supposing each records gets expanded, I will have huge number of records to insert into some_other_table. I am worried about the performance of such a program. Are there efficient ways to handle this? –  Arcs Feb 10 '12 at 13:45
    
@Arcs: if you're concerned about the performance of this approach, test it out with (say) 1000 records, and then test it on 10000 or 100000 records, or maybe even more. I haven't done any performance testing on this function, so I don't know how well it will perform. If you have 10 million rows in some_table and each of them could generate 100 rows each, you've got 1 billion rows. It will always take a long time to insert 1 billion rows, no matter how you insert them. –  Luke Woodward Feb 10 '12 at 20:29
    
Will BULK COLLECT help in processing such a large number of records? –  Arcs Feb 11 '12 at 11:32
    
@Arcs: I don't know what will help you because I don't have your data and I don't understand exactly what you're doing with it. If you want to find out whether BULK COLLECT will help, try it out on a smaller number of records (say 10000). Also, if using BULK COLLECT, be aware of memory usage issues such as this one: asktom.oracle.com/pls/apex/… –  Luke Woodward Feb 11 '12 at 12:58

Replace * to %, ? to _ and use LIKE clause with resulting values.

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How is it going to help? Please explain. For '????' I m doing something like this: declare v_rule varchar2(50) := '????52132'; v_cc varchar2(50) ; v_nat varchar2(50); v_wild number; n number; begin v_cc:= substr(v_rule,1,4); v_nat := substr(v_rule,5); dbms_output.put_line (v_cc || ' '|| v_nat); if instr(v_cc, '????') <> 0 then v_wild := 4; end if; n :=power(10,v_wild); for i in 0..n-1 loop dbms_output.put_line(substr(lpad(to_char(i),v_wild,'0' ),0,4)); end loop; end; –  Arcs Feb 7 '12 at 11:11

To expand on @Oleg Dok's answer, which uses the little known fact that an underscore means the same as % but only for a single character and using PL\SQL I think the following is the simplest way to do it. A good description of how to use connect by is here.

declare

  cursor c_min_max( Crule varchar2 ) is
    select to_number(min(numb)) as min_n, to_number(max(numb)) as max_n
      from ( select '0000' as numb
               from dual
              union
             select lpad(level, 4, '0') as numb
               from dual
            connect by level <= 9999 )
     where to_char(numb) like replace(Crule, '?', '_');

  t_mm c_min_max%rowtype;

  l_rule varchar2(4) := '?091';

begin

  open c_min_max(l_rule);

  fetch c_min_max
    into t_mm;

  close c_min_max;

  for i in t_mm.min_n .. t_mm.max_n loop

    dbms_output.put_line(lpad(i, 4, '0'));

  end loop;

end;
/
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