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I have this LINQ query in a method:

public List<String> GetListNameUsers() 
{
    using (var context = new UCDataContext()) 
    {
        return (from c in context.Users
                select (c.LastName + " " + c.FirstName) ).ToList();
    }
}

but this does not work. I want to return a string composed by FirstName + " " + LastName.

I am binding the result of this method to a DropDownList, as follows:

<asp:DropDownList ID="DropDownList1" runat="server" DataSourceID="UsersODS"
     DataTextField="LastName" DataValueField="IDUser" />

The field LastName isn't recognized when my DropDownList is being databound.

How can I solve this?

Thanks in advance.

Luigi

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2  
What specifically do you mean by "this does not work"? What exactly is the problem? Is this LINQ to SQL or what? –  Mark Byers Feb 7 '12 at 11:40
    
-1 Because from one of your comments the problem is actually with binding this query to a dropdown –  Adrian Iftode Feb 7 '12 at 11:50
    
Because give me this error (at runtime): DataBinding: 'System.String' does not contain a property with the name 'LastName'. Description: An unhandled exception The problem, I think, is that my DropDownList has this property: DataTextField="LastName" Luigi –  Ciupaz Feb 7 '12 at 12:57

3 Answers 3

public IList GetListNameUsers() 
{
    using (var context = new UCDataContext()) 
    {
        return (from c in context.Users
                select new { 
                     Name = c.LastName + " " + c.FirstName,
                     IDUser = c.IDUser
                   }
               ).ToList();
    }
}

<asp:DropDownList ID="DropDownList1" runat="server" DataSourceID="UsersODS"
     DataTextField="Name" DataValueField="IDUser" />
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1  
Perfect, thank you so much Adrian! –  Ciupaz Feb 7 '12 at 14:03
1  
@Ciupaz Now for once press the accept checkmark. Come on. –  Gert Arnold Feb 7 '12 at 14:19
    
This appears to be the most appropriate answer, can someone please mark it as such. What is key here is that he's selecting a complex object (as opposed to just a series of concatenated string values) which also contains a correlation ID that can be used for data binding purposes. –  Shaun Wilson Aug 15 '13 at 21:05

First fetch the records (using ToList) then do the string concatenation in your client side

public List<String> GetListNameUsers()
{

 using (var context = new UCDataContext())
 {
     return context.Users
                   .Select(c=>new {c.LastName, c.FirstName})
                   .ToList()
                   .Select(c=>c.LastName + " " + c.FirstName)
                   .ToList();
 }

}
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The problem is that your context provider is a database, which means that the LINQ expression has to be converted to an SQL-query. The SQL query generator may not support the conversion of string concatenation to proper SQL. Instead you could just convert the users to a plain old list and perform the select on that list instead.

Something like:

public List<String> GetListNameUsers()
{

 using (var context = new UCDataContext())
 {
     var users = (from c in context.Users.ToList()
             select (c.LastName + " " + c.FirstName) ).ToList();
 }

}
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