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I am working on something and I have to instantiate the class. My question is where would I do that at? Would I do it before this:

public partial class Form1 : Form
    {
       InputClass myclass = new InputClass();
        public Form1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
        }


Or

public partial class Form1 : Form
    {

        public Form1()
        {

        InputClass myclass = new InputClass();

            InitializeComponent();
        }

Here is another code I am working on but it is not working out to well this is what my code looks like right now:

public partial class Form1 : Form
{


    InputClass myClass = new InputClass();
    myClass.yourname = "";
    myClass.Banner = "";

 public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

I am new to C# and I am trying to figure this out. I need to instantiate the class. Then when the page load add to set the labels text from the _banner variable. Then add code to set the property yourname from the text in the textbox when the user presses the button. Then i need to clear the textbox. I also have to display the name in a messagebox from the class.

 class InputClass
{
    public string _banner;
    private string _yourName;

    public InputClass(String _banner)
    {
        this._banner = _banner;
    }

    public string yourName
    {
        get { return _yourName; }
        set { _yourName = value; }
    }

}

}

share|improve this question
1  
could you clarify what are you trying to say? – onatm Feb 7 '12 at 11:48
    
"it is not working out to well" - Could you be more specific? Do you get a compile error or does the program fail to work as expected? What specifically is not working and what is the exact error you get? – Mark Byers Feb 7 '12 at 12:02
    
'WindowsFormsApplication1.InputClass' does not contain a constructor that takes 0 arguments 'WindowsFormsApplication1.Form1.myClass' is a 'field' but is used like a 'type' Theses are the errors I get. – snorris Feb 7 '12 at 12:07
    
@snorris: What constructors does InputClass have? Can you post the source code for the constructors of that class? – Mark Byers Feb 7 '12 at 12:36
    
Yes I can I will edit it. – snorris Feb 7 '12 at 12:47
up vote 5 down vote accepted

If you want to access your object from other methods in your class then you need to use a member field rather than a local variable.

private InputClass myClass = new InputClass { YourName = "", Banner = "" };

public Form1()
{
    InitializeComponent();
}

Another option is to declare a member field but initialize it inside the constructor:

private InputClass myClass;

public Form1()
{
    InitializeComponent();
    this.myClass = new InputClass { YourName = "", Banner = "" };
}

This isn't too useful in your specific case, but it can be useful if you need to pass parameters from your constructor to the InputClass constructor.

share|improve this answer

You can only set the properties inside a function body! not inside the class context.

Instantiating the class would work inside Form1() or at declaration time. IMO best style in your case would be:

public partial class Form1 : Form
{

    InputClass myclass;
    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        myclass = new InputClass();
    }
}

This enables one to use myClass not only in the Form1 constructor, but also in any other function.

share|improve this answer

First of all, make the distinction between Declaration and Instantiation. In your first snippet, you're declaring the InputClass member in the class scope, meaning it will be shared by all methods in the class. Once you do that, it doesn't matter if you instantiate it in the constructor or during declaration, it (mostly) works out to the same thing.

Secondly, I'm guessing that this is an ASP.NET project, since you refer to "page load". If so, remember that your Form1 instance doesn't stay alive between page loads. Every time you reload the page, either manually with F5 or via button-clicks/postbacks, you're creating a new instance of Form1, which will create a new instance of InputClass.

share|improve this answer

What you're doing in the first example is a declaration of a member variable of Form1 named myclass. You can assign it a value at the same place, which is fine:

public partial class Form1 : Form
{
    InputClass myclass = new InputClass();
    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }
}

But you usually cannot insert actual code statements in your class declaration (like the assignment myClass.yourname = ""). You need to put them in the constructor. So a correct way to do this would be:

public partial class Form1 : Form
{
    InputClass myClass = new InputClass();

    public Form1()
    {
        myClass.yourname = "";
        myClass.Banner = "";
        InitializeComponent();
    }
}

For performing actions on button click, look here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/43sxkdeb(v=vs.80).aspx

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