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I would like to perform the same operation on several arrays, something like:

#include<vector>
#include<algorithm>
int main(void){
    std::vector<double> a, b;
    for(auto& ab:{a,b}) std::sort(ab.begin(),ab.end()); // error 
}

This code fails, since auto& is a const-reference. Is there an elegant way around it?

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1  
What is {a,b}? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 7 '12 at 11:54
2  
@Lightness it's an std::initializer_list<std::vector<double>>. problem here is that the iterators of an initializer list are always const. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Feb 7 '12 at 11:56
    
So there you go. I wonder whether some rvalue forwarding magic could help here. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 7 '12 at 11:59

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I think the issue is that it's a bit like binding a temporary to a non-const reference. There is no "concrete" collection there so it is a bit like a temporary.

IF you have a temporary vector there, it will bind to a const reference but not a non-const one.

I also think this won't ever work what you are doing, but this should work:

#include<vector> 
#include<algorithm> 
int main(void)
{     
    std::vector<double> a, b;     
    for(std::vector<double>* ab:{&a,&b}) 
      std::sort(ab->begin(),ab->end()); // or begin(*ab),end(*ab)
} 

and auto may work too.

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Oh yes pointers solve it in an elegant way, thanks. And one can write both auto and auto* :-) –  eudoxos Feb 7 '12 at 12:09
3  
my immediate feeling of what you were doing was that even if you got it to compile, you'd effectively be sorting copies. That is why you're lucky in a way that the compiler stopped you. –  CashCow Feb 7 '12 at 12:11
    
@CashCow: Correct, std::initializer_list automatically copies. –  Xeo Feb 7 '12 at 12:14
    
I think the C++11 standard is that the compiler can optimise and substitute any copy with a move if a move is available and would work in the situation, i.e. the object is not re-used in its existing state. In this case you don't want your vectors a and b to be moved, you want them to be sorted. –  CashCow Feb 7 '12 at 13:31

This code fails, since auto& is a const-reference. [emphasis mine]

Your reasoning doesn't hold. In a range-based for loop, what you declare (here, auto& ab) is not bound to the range expression (here, {a,b }). Instead, ab will be initialized from the elements of the range, not the range itself.

Instead the error stems from calling std::sort with parameters ab.begin()/ab.end(), which can easily be witnessed by commenting the body of the loop. As RMartinho has pointed out, the elements of the std::initializer_list<std::vector<double>> are immutable, and you can't sort a const container (std::sort shuffles elements using moves, can't assign to a const element).

Assuming you want to (independently) sort both vectors, you can do:

for(auto& ab: { std::ref(a), std::ref(b) })
    std::sort(std::begin(ab.get()), std::end(ab.get()));

Notice that according to template argument deduction rules, auto& is fine here and auto will be deduced to const std::reference_wrapper<std::vector<double>>, yielding std::reference_wrapper<std::vector<double>> const& as the type of ab.

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I was thinking the same: you can't have a vector of references because it lacks the semantics but an initializer list of std::ref might well work for it, in which case you wouldn't need to dereference the pointers like I did. I am not sure you need auto&, auto might do fine as get() is a const member of a std::ref. Same way that mine works as I have const pointers but not pointers to const. –  CashCow Feb 7 '12 at 15:26
    
Is this a special feature of std::ref? Why isn't auto deduced to const std::ref_t<std::vector<double> > & on which you can call std::vector<double>& get() const –  CashCow Feb 7 '12 at 15:29
    
@CashCow My mistake, std::vector<T> doesn't have a get member and I did indeed wanted to refer to std::reference_wrapper<std::vector<double>>. Thanks for the heads up. –  Luc Danton Feb 7 '12 at 16:51
    
Yes you're right it's reference_wrapper not ref_t. I quite like that your answer uses references although in some ways it's no less indirection than my solution with pointers. –  CashCow Feb 7 '12 at 17:06
    
@CashCow Indeed, std::reference_wrapper<T> advantages over T* are implicit construction from T, implicit conversion to T& and a forwarding operator(). None of those things matters here. I just used std::ref out of habit. –  Luc Danton Feb 7 '12 at 17:44

I think CashCows solution is nice. Just to show a different way: You could also use variadic templates to solve this.

#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>

using namespace std;

void mysort() {} // termination version

template<typename Arg1, typename... Args>
void mysort(Arg1 &arg1, Args&... args )
{
    sort(arg1.begin(), arg1.end());
    mysort(args...);
}

int main(void)
{
    vector<double> a, b;
    mysort(a, b);
}

@CashCow: It is possible to pass an algorithm as argument but it is a little bit ugly because of the use of decltype:

#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>

using namespace std;

template<typename Algo>
void mysort(Algo algo) {} // termination version

template<typename Algo, typename Arg1, typename... Args>
void mysort(Algo algo, Arg1 &arg1, Args&... args )
{
    algo(arg1.begin(), arg1.end());
    mysort(algo, args...);
}

int main(void)
{
    vector<double> a, b;
    mysort(&sort<decltype(a.begin())>, a, b);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Nice but can we add a lambda to your variadic template that allows us to put in the algorithm we want to call, i.e. modify the sort to any algorithm that takes a range. Incidentally doesn't sort work now on a range without having to specify being and end? Algorithms will automatically call that for you. I couldn't do that in my solution because it took pointers. –  CashCow Feb 7 '12 at 15:30
    
@CashCow see my edit for a version which takes an algorithm as parameter. –  frast Feb 7 '12 at 17:36

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