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In a visual c++ cli project file i created the following class (c++ type) . not able to declere a string or char type suitable for name variable.

#include <vector>
#include <string.h>
using namespace std ;

class MyClass 
{
public :
int x;
int y;
string * name;

void foo() { name = "S.O.S" ;}
};

P.s . type casting err

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4  
It's #include <string> not #include <string.h>. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Feb 7 '12 at 13:05

2 Answers 2

You need to make the following changes:

#include <string> // not <string.h>

class MyClass
{
public:
    int x;
    int y;
    string name; // not string*
};

EDIT:

To address comments by eliz, a small example:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

class MyClass
{
public:
    int x;
    int y;
    string name;

    string foo()
    {
        name = "OK";
        return name;
    }
};

int main()
{
    MyClass m;

    // Will print "OK" to standard output.
    std::cout << "m.foo()=" << m.foo() << "\n";

    // Will print "1" to standard output as strings match.
    std::cout << ("OK" == m.foo()) << "\n";

    return 0;
}
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alternatively he could use `name = new string("S.O.S"), but that would be quite dangerous if there isn't a copy constructor –  Petesh Feb 7 '12 at 13:08
    
@Petesh, I was going to suggest that, but decided using string was simpler. –  hmjd Feb 7 '12 at 13:09
    
@hmjd how can i check your answer string foo() {name = "OK"; return name ;} –  eliz Feb 7 '12 at 13:12
    
If you mean check it works correctly, then just compare the return value: if ("OK" == m.foo()), where m is an instance of MyClass. –  hmjd Feb 7 '12 at 13:20
    
@hmjd how can i check your answer. string foo() {name = "OK"; return name ;} –  eliz Feb 7 '12 at 13:23

If name is of type string *, then you must call one of the string constructors.

name = new string("S.O.S");

And don't forget to release your string in the destructor (~MyClass())!

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Copy constructor and assignment operator would also need implemented as the default versions would be insufficient. –  hmjd Feb 7 '12 at 13:21
    
Yes, the big four is necessary for every class with dynamic data. –  Alexander Feb 7 '12 at 13:30
    
@hmjd ( m.foo() ) not works. It should be m->foo() –  eliz Feb 7 '12 at 13:31

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