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I'm trying to move from stdio to iostream, which is proving very difficult. I've got the basics of loading a file and closing them, but I really don't have a clue as to what a stream even is yet, or how they work.

In stdio everything's relatively easy and straight forward compared to this. What I need to be able to do is

  1. Read a single character from a text file.
  2. Call a function based on what that character is.
  3. Repeat till I've read all the characters in the file.

What I have so far is.. not much:

int main()
{
    std::ifstream("sometextfile.txt", std::ios::in);
    // this is SUPPOSED to be the while loop for reading.  I got here and realized I have 
    //no idea how to even read a file
    while()
    {
    }
return 0;
}

What I need to know is how to get a single character and how that character is actually stored(Is it a string? An int? A char? Can I decide for myself how to store it?)

Once I know that I think I can handle the rest. I'll store the character in an appropriate container, then use a switch to do things based on what that character actually is. It'd look something like this.

int main()
{
    std::ifstream textFile("sometextfile.txt", std::ios::in);

    while(..able to read?)
    {
        char/int/string readItem;
        //this is where the fstream would get the character and I assume stick it into readItem?
        switch(readItem)
        {
        case 1:
            //dosomething
              break;
        case ' ':
            //dosomething etc etc
              break;
        case '\n':
        }
    }
return 0;
}

Notice that I need to be able to check for white space and new lines, hopefully it's possible. It would also be handy if instead of one generic container I could store numbers in an int and chars in a char. I can work around it if not though.

Thanks to anyone who can explain to me how streams work and what all is possible with them.

share|improve this question
    
The method for reading a single "character" is get. As you can see it can be used to read more than one character as well. –  Joachim Pileborg Feb 7 '12 at 13:18

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You also can abstract away the whole idea of getting a single character with streambuf_iterators, if you want to use any algorithms:

#include <iterator>
#include <fstream>

int main(){
  typedef std::istreambuf_iterator<char> buf_iter;
  std::fstream file("name");
  for(buf_iter i(file), e; i != e; ++i){
    char c = *i;
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
After googling a little about iterators, I think this is the right way to go, but I still have a lot of research to do before I fully understand what's going on here. Thanks for the introduction to iterators. –  Jcrack Feb 7 '12 at 16:35

You can also use standard for_each algorithm:

#include <iterator>
#include <algorithm>
#include <fstream>

void handleChar(const char& c)
{
    switch (c) {
        case 'a': // do something
            break;
        case 'b': // do something else
            break;
        // etc.
    }
}

int main()
{
    std::ifstream file("file.txt");
    if (file)
        std::for_each(std::istream_iterator<char>(file),
                      std::istream_iterator<char>(),
                      handleChar);
    else {
        // couldn't open the file
    }
}

istream_iterator skips whitespace characters. If those are meaningful in your file use istreambuf_iterator instead.

share|improve this answer
    
Note that istream_iterator will construct a sentry for every token it reads IIRC, which in case of a single char can be quite the overhead. –  Xeo Feb 8 '12 at 7:52

fstream::get

Next time you have similar problem go to cplusplusreference or similar site, locate class you have problem with and read description of every method. Normally, this solves the problem. Googling also works.

share|improve this answer
while (textFile.good()) {
  char a;
  textFile.get(a);
   switch(a)
        {
        case 1:
            //dosomething
              break;
        case ' ':
            //dosomething etc etc
              break;
        case '\n':
    }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Make the read be the test in your read loops (stackoverflow.com/a/8558959/46642). –  R. Martinho Fernandes Feb 7 '12 at 13:26
    
and don't declare automatic variables inside a loop –  KevinDTimm Feb 7 '12 at 14:01
    
@KevinDTimm, why? –  AProgrammer Feb 7 '12 at 15:31
1  
@KevinDTimm, I used to think earlier the same way, but having studied assembler code generated by modern compilators I saw that they are very clever and allocate memory for such variables BEFORE loop. –  mikithskegg Feb 7 '12 at 15:39
2  
@KevinDTimm: I'd advise to concentrate on big picture instead. Optimal algorithms and code readability are top priority. The "measure before optimizing" principle is for everything else. –  SigTerm Feb 7 '12 at 18:00

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