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I am building a Java application to process files on a local FS (NTFS, but a solution that would allow an easy extension to Linux filesystems in future would be nice). The problem is that a single file cannot be processed more than once in case of two instances (processes) of my application running simultaneously.

Seems like I need to lock each file before processing it somehow. The application does not use a database and using one just for the purpose of locking does not seem convenient.

So I was thinking about appending a postfix to the filename. The question is, how (if it's possible) to ask if a filename ends with a postfix and then append the postfix atomically.

Other tricks to achieve what I need are also appreciated.

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Why not open the file in exclusive mode and keep it opened (another instance just won't be able to open it then)? –  Eugene Mayevski 'EldoS Corp Feb 7 '12 at 19:03

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can perhaps take an advantage of the fact that file rename operation is atomic on most file systems. Your logic could be like this:

  1. Get file list, for each file:
  2. Try to rename the file
  3. If rename succeed - work on the file
  4. If rename fails - don't work on the file
  5. Got to 2
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I think i'll go this way. Thanks! –  Dušan Rychnovský Feb 7 '12 at 14:20

Something like this should work:

File someFile = new File(path);
if ( !someFile.getName().endsWith(".locked") ) {
    File lockedFile = new File(someFile.getAbsolutePath() + ".locked");
    someFile.renameTo(lockedFile);
}
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1  
Will this really work or will there be a race condition, because the "test and rename" action is not atomic? –  Dušan Rychnovský Feb 7 '12 at 14:02

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