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I want to match the longest sequence that is repeating at least once

Having:

T_send_ack-new_amend_pending-cancel-replace_replaced_cancel_pending-cancel-replace_replaced

the result should be: pending-cancel-replace_replaced

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In which language? –  anubhava Feb 7 '12 at 14:06
    
is there language convention for REGEX's? –  mircea . Feb 7 '12 at 14:09
2  
Yes, there is. This is not possible with POSIX regular expressions, you need engine-specific features like back-references in PCRE. –  soulmerge Feb 7 '12 at 14:12

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try this

(.+)(?=.*\1)

See it here on Regexr

This will match any character sequence with at least one character, that is repeated later on in the string.

You would need to store your matches and decide which one is the longest afterwards.

This solution requires your regex flavour to support backreferences and lookaheads.

it will match any character sequence with at least one character .+ and store it in the group 1 because of the brackets around it. The next step is the positive lookahead (?=.*\1), it will be true if the captured sequence occurs at a later point again in the string.

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This will match the first repeated char (ie _), not the longuest sequence. –  Toto Feb 7 '12 at 14:51
    
@M42 see the Regexr link, it will match any character sequence (means at least one character) that is repeated later on and you are right, the first match is "_". –  stema Feb 7 '12 at 15:07
    
OK, it'll match all sequences if you add the global flag. –  Toto Feb 7 '12 at 15:10
    
@M42 the OP didn't mention his language, therefore no global flag, because thats Perl, but +1 to you for your complete solution. –  stema Feb 7 '12 at 21:50
    
Fastest reply gets the accepted vote. Thank you for all the other answers. –  mircea . Feb 23 '12 at 10:52

Here a perl script that does the job:

#!/usr/bin/perl 
use strict;
use warnings;
use 5.010;

my $s = q/T_send_ack-new_amend_pending-cancel-replace_replaced_cancel_pending-cancel-replace_replaced/;
my $max = 0;
my $seq = '';
while($s =~ /(.+)(?=.*\1)/g) {
    if(length$1 > $max) {
        $max = length $1;
        $seq = $1;
    }
}
say "longuest sequence : $seq, length = $max"

output:

longuest sequence : _pending-cancel-replace_replaced, length = 32
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Using Perl you can do:

s='T_send_ack-new_amend_pending-cancel-replace_replaced_cancel_pending-cancel-replace_replaced'
echo $s | perl -pe 's/([^\s]+)(?=.*?\1)/\1\n/g'

Which gives:

T_
send_
ac
k-
n
e
w_
a
mend
_pending-cancel-replace_replaced
_
cancel
_
p
e
n
d
in
g-
c
a
nce
l
-replace
_re
placed

Then you need to post process it in any language or script to get longest text.

One Possible Post Processing of repeated string can be using awk:

echo $s | perl -pe 's/([^\s]+)(?=.*?\1)/\1\n/g' | awk '{ if (length($0) > max) {max = length($0); maxline = $0} } END { print maxline }'

Which prints:

_pending-cancel-replace_replaced

PS: Note longest string here is _pending-cancel-replace_replaced

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I have to admit that this one got me thinking. It was obvious that positive lookahead is absolutely necessary to solve this with regex. Anyhow here is how it would work in Java:

public static String biggestOccurance(String input){
    Pattern p = Pattern.compile("(.+)(?=.*\\1)");
    Matcher m = p.matcher(input);

    String longestOccurence = "";
    while(m.find()){
        if(longestOccurence.length() < m.group(1).length()) longestOccurence = m.group(1);
    }
    return longestOccurence;
}

The thing that got me stuck was the

\\1

I knew that you could refer to a backreference in Java with

$1

but if you replace $1 with \\1 it will not work.

Will have to dig into that.

Cheers,Eugene.

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