Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This code shows the problem (OBS: requires a file called text-file.txt in same directory as script):

var fs = require('fs');
var http = require('http');

var file = fs.createReadStream('text-file.txt');
console.log('1:', file.readable);

var req = http.request({}, function (res) {
    console.log('2:', file.readable);
});
req.end();

The output of that is:

1: true
2: false

instead of being true in both cases. Why is this, and how can I get a readable ReadableStream inside the callback function?

The weird thing is that the following code returns true in both cases, which writes to a file instead of reading from it:

var fs = require('fs');
var http = require('http');

var file = fs.createWriteStream('new-file.txt');
console.log('1:', file.writable);

var req = http.request({}, function (res) {
    console.log('2:', file.writable);
});
req.end();
share|improve this question
    
I should probably add that this is with Node.js 0.6.10, the latest stable version, on Linux. –  Jeppe Toustrup Feb 7 '12 at 14:34

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Well when you create a readable stream, it is readable first. It will fire some data events, and when the whole file is finished, it won't be readable anymore because there is nothing more left in the file to be read and there is no data events. This data events will be fired whether you bind a callback to them or not. In here, by the time the callback is fired, the file has most probably finished and there are no more data events remaining, that's why it's not readable anymore.

var fs = require('fs');
var http = require('http');

var file = fs.createReadStream('text-file.txt');
console.log('1:', file.readable);

file.on('data', function(data) {
    console.log('3:', file.readable, data); //it will fire chunks of the body of file
});

file.on('end', function() {
    console.log('4:', file.readable); //This means there is no data events anymore, file finished
});

var req = http.request({}, function (res) {
    console.log('2:', file.readable);
});
req.end();

You can also pause the stream and resume it in the callback so it will be ready:

var fs = require('fs');
var http = require('http');

var file = fs.createReadStream('text-file.txt');
file.pause();
console.log('1:', file.readable);

var req = http.request({}, function (res) {
    file.resume();
    console.log('2:', file.readable);
});
req.end();

And of course in case of writable stream, it will writable till when you end the stream, it is not a file being read that will be finished, you determine when you are finished after writing to it and you finish it.

And for your knowledge a TCP is both writeable and readable till it's end. So there can be data events, when the other end is writing to it and you make data events when you are writing to it.

So technically this won't be writable anymore:

var fs = require('fs');
var http = require('http');

var file = fs.createWriteStream('new-file.txt');
console.log('1:', file.writable);
file.end('I wanna sleep!');
console.log('2:', file.writable);
var req = http.request({}, function (res) {
    console.log('3:', file.writable);
});
req.end();
share|improve this answer
    
Great, thank you! The use of .pause() made it work. I have only just started to use streams, so I didn't catch that. Perhaps I'll try to make a patch to the documentation in order to clear it up for other people. –  Jeppe Toustrup Feb 7 '12 at 19:28
    
It took me some time to understand streams in Node. These links may help you: docs.nodejitsu.com/articles/advanced/streams –  Farid Nouri Neshat Feb 8 '12 at 1:36

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.