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I have a svnserver with this configuration in svnserve.conf:

anon-access = none
auth-access = write
authz-db = ../../authz

Inside the authz file I have some users, which should have only access to a sub-path like this:

[groups]
INTERNAL=me
EXTERNAL=johndoe

[/]
@INTERNAL = rw
@EXTERNAL = 

[/ProjectX/trunk]
@EXTERNAL = rw

This should prevent the external users to read all sources.

But this solution has one big problem: some svn client tools can not use "svn show log" on all sources. They are trying to read without an authentication and this fails.

Is there a way, how I can force the following tools to use authentication when accessing the svn log?

  • TortoiseSvn
  • Jenkins (Subversion plugin)
share|improve this question

If a user has no read access upon a particular Subversion URL, they won't be able to run svn log on that URL. User johndoe simply won't be able to run svn log svn://repos.mycomp.com/ProjectY/branches, but will be able to run svn log svn://repos.mycomp.com/ProjectX/trunk.

Is this what you're asking?


Response to rechifl

To be clear: my problem is that tools used by the groud INTERNAL are not able to access the log of all paths. E.g Jenkins fails to run a job after a commit, because it can not read the revision details. The only way would be to enable read acces for anonymous. But this is not a solution for me.

Most sites setup a special Jenkins account that allows Jenkins to at least read from the repository. (Read-only access will allow builds to be triggered, but you won't be able to create a tag via Jenkins). Can you at least do that?

When you create a job in Jenkins, it should complain that it can't access the URL In the repository. Then, give you a link to enter in the authentication. Click on a the link and a new browser window will popup. Enter in the credentials in that screen.

This should be okay for your security issues. You don't have anonymous read access, and Jenkins will be the only one using that (read-only) account. You can even limit access to particular Jenkins jobs if you don't want users who don't have read access to that particular part of the repository to take a peek at the build and the changes.

Not sure where TortoiseSVN fits into this picture for you, but this will allow you to use Jenkins.

share|improve this answer
    
Your response assumes an authenticated user that simply lacks permissions. The OP is asking how to cause Tortoise/Jenkins to perform authentication so they aren't operating as anonymous users. – KOGI Feb 7 '12 at 20:52
    
To be clear: my problem is that tools used by the groud INTERNAL are not able to acces the log of all paths. E.g Jenkins fails to run a job after a commit, because it can not read the revision details. The only way would be to enable read acces for anonymous. But this is not a solution for me. – reschifl Feb 8 '12 at 8:17
    
@KOGI - If you want to browse the history (or see if there are changes) in TortoiseSVN w/o a checkout, you need to put in your account and password. If you are trying to determine the changes in Jenkins, you give Jenkins the URL when you setup the job, and then give it an account and password. The problem is that the OP wants to allow the user to be able to see changes without actually granting them access to that part of the repository. – David W. Feb 8 '12 at 15:13
    
@reschifl - See the mods in my answer – David W. Feb 8 '12 at 15:23
    
@David W.: I know how to set svn credentials on Jenkins. But Jenkins only uses them for checkout (read) or creating tags etc. (write). At the beginnig of a job run, Jenkins tries to retrieve the Subversion log to read revision details. But this is done by using some kind of "svn show log" command of the underlaying SvnKit. And this is done without any authentication. And with my Subversion configured to anon = none, Jenkins fails perfoming this task and the job also fails. – reschifl Feb 10 '12 at 12:03

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