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I have a list of integers.

What I would like to do is to sort them and remove all duplicates. I saw two different solutions on the internet. Both seem to give the same result which is not the one I expect.

a = integer_combinations(5, 5)
print a
>>[4, 8, 16, 32, 9, 27, 81, 243, 16, 64, 256, 1024, 25, 125, 625, 3125]

b = sorted(a)
print b
>>[4, 8, 9, 16, 16, 25, 27, 32, 64, 81, 125, 243, 256, 625, 1024, 3125]

c = dict().fromkeys(sorted(a)).keys()
print c
>> [32, 64, 4, 1024, 625, 8, 9, 256, 16, 81, 243, 3125, 25, 27, 125]

Another method, using sets:

d = list(set(b))
print d
>> [32, 64, 4, 1024, 625, 8, 9, 256, 16, 81, 243, 3125, 25, 27, 125]   

What I expect is :
>>[4, 8, 9, 16, 25, 27, 32, 64, 81, 125, 243, 256, 625, 1024, 3125]

Would someone know the reason of this behaviour?

Thanks!

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5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Here is what I would use:

>>> a = [4, 8, 16, 32, 9, 27, 81, 243, 16, 64, 256, 1024, 25, 125, 625, 3125]
>>> sorted(set(a))
[4, 8, 9, 16, 25, 27, 32, 64, 81, 125, 243, 256, 625, 1024, 3125]

The reason your code doesn't work as expected is that dict does not guarantee any particular ordering of its keys. Similarly, set has no guarantees as to the ordering of its elements.

Therefore, the sorting step has to come right at the end.

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1  
Actually, this is actually what I had done. . . the order of function calls reversed. Your way of doing it seem better. –  jlengrand Feb 7 '12 at 15:31
    
Also consider using frozenset when you know it won't be mutable. In this case doesn't matter but allows you to hash, thus place in another set or dictionary if you are doing this for multiple integer combinations. –  Daniel DeSousa Feb 7 '12 at 15:32
    
Thanks, I look at that. Lots of new vocabulary for me here :) –  jlengrand Feb 7 '12 at 15:32

set() is an unordered collection. Like dictionary it permutes keys on purpose for fast access. Therefore: list(set(...)) returns list of unsorted items. Use instead:

sorted(set(...))

if you need ordered sequence.

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This doesn't answer the OP's question. –  Ethan Furman Feb 7 '12 at 21:40
    
Hmm, I should read the question more carefully. The answer is: set() is unordered collection. Like dictionary it permutes keys on purpose for fast access. Therefore: list(set(...)) returns list of unsorted items. Use instead: sorted(set(...)) if you need ordered sequence. –  Samvel Feb 8 '12 at 14:32

Python set was introduced in version 2.3. Solution proposed by @aix is most Pythonic if you are using Python >=2.3

In your code, the following line ...

c = dict().fromkeys(sorted(a)).keys()

creates a dict with keys from a and values default to None. And then, just retrieves the keys using keys() method. Since dictionaries have no defined order, the elements are retrieved randomly. You need to resort them. In any case, you should really use sorted(set(a)) as proposed already.

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I don't see the point in using sorted anyway. If anything you would use sorted on the outside: c = sorted(dict().fromkeys(a).keys()) . There's no point in doing it the other way. –  Joel Cornett Feb 7 '12 at 15:48
    
I agree. It seemed like OP arrived at a possible solution by doing a quick search on the internet ... " I saw two different solutions on the internet." And the solution he found was very dated. And he asked "Would someone know the reason of this behaviour?" So I was just trying to explain the behavior. As mentioned, sorted(set(a)) is the right way to solve this. –  Praveen Gollakota Feb 7 '12 at 15:56

dictionary doesn't guarantee iterating (and printing) keys in insertion order .

Use collections.OrderedDict for that.

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The keys method returns the keys of a dictionary in an undefined (yet consistent between calls) order, regardless of how the dictionary is created. [EDIT: as pointed out in the comment, the order is consistent as long as the dictionary remains unchanged.]

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1  
The order can change when keys are added or removed. –  Ethan Furman Feb 7 '12 at 21:40

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