Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm building a Perl application that relies on Moose. One task the Moose object needs to accomplish is to use File::Find to populate an attribute with a list of files. I'm having some trouble figuring out how to use find's \&wanted code reference in a way that will let me maintain access to a $self version of the Moose object.

So far, I have this:

#!/usr/bin/perl

package MyMoose;

use Modern::Perl;
use Moose;
use File::Find;
use FindBin qw($Bin);

### Attribute to hold the file list
has "file_list" => (
    is => 'rw',
    isa => 'ArrayRef',
    default => sub {[]}
);


### Method to populate the file list
sub update_file_list {

    my $self = shift;

    find(\&wanted, $Bin);

}


### File::Find wanted sub
sub wanted {

    ### This won't work, but shows what I'd like to do
    #   my $self = shift;
    #   ### Do some filtering
    #   push @{$self->file_list}, $File::Find::name;

}


1;


######################################################################
### Main package to test the object.

package main;

use Data::Dumper;

run_main() unless caller();

sub run_main {

    my $m = MyMoose->new();

    $m->update_file_list();

    print Dumper $m->file_list;

}

It runs, but obviously doesn't assemble a file list. That's the part I'm trying to figure out.

What's the proper way to use File::Find so that it will let you have access to the Moose object during processing?

share|improve this question
    
Not directly related to your question, but you might want to take a look at the recurse method in Path::Class::Dir, which can be used instead of File::Find. –  Lumi Feb 7 '12 at 16:59

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The problem is that you don't have access to $self within wanted sub. You can use inline closure and default or builder to build the list.

Edit: updated code per updated question

has "file_list" => (
    is => 'rw',
    isa => 'ArrayRef',
    default => sub {
        my $self = shift;
        return $self->_get_file_list();
    },
);

sub update_file_list {
    my $self = shift;
    $self->file_list($self->_get_file_list());
}

sub _get_file_list {
    my @files;
    find(sub { push @files, $File::Find::name }, $Bin);
    return \@files;
}

_get_file_list method returns arrayref of files found. It is used both in default and update_file_list method to populate the attribute.

share|improve this answer
    
In the original example, I shouldn't have put the call in BUILD. I actually need to be able to update the file list arbitrarily via it's own method. (I've updated the question example code to represent this.) So, default won't help here. I'll do some looking at builder to see how it behaves. –  Alan W. Smith Feb 7 '12 at 17:06
    
@AlanW.Smith - please see the update. Builder is no different from default actually, you just specify method by name, so you can benefit from overriding it in subclasses. –  bvr Feb 7 '12 at 18:18

As bvr notes, the subroutine reference passed to find doesn't need to be a named package method — a lexical closure will work just fine. Thus, you can do this:

sub update_file_list {

    my $self = shift;

    my $wanted = sub {

        ### Do some filtering
        push @{$self->file_list}, $File::Find::name;

    };

    find($wanted, $Bin);    

}

The lexical variable $self declared in the outer function scope will be visible in the inner function.

In particular, every time the update_file_list method is called, a new $self and a new $wanted will be created (and bound together by the inner reference to $self), so that it's perfectly safe to call the method several times on different objects, even recursively if you want.

share|improve this answer

After some trial an error, I also got the script to work by replacing the original version of 'update_file_list' with this:

sub update_file_list {

    my $self = shift;

    find( sub { wanted($self); }, $Bin );

}

That seems to work as well.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.