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I have two forms, and by default, they will appear in the HTML page vertically. However, due to the limitation of the page's space, it is better to arrange them in a horizontal way, with the help of CSS.

The forms are as follows:

<form>Form A</form>
<form>Form B</form>

Any help in CSS?

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What did you try, what went wrong? –  David Thomas Feb 7 '12 at 16:40
    
I tried the following css:.form_style { display: inline; vertical-align: middle; clear: both; } but it doesn't work. –  Qiang Xu Feb 7 '12 at 16:42
    
WhatHaveYouTried.com - you need to add things to your post. Despite that @Caleb as given you the answer, most people don't want to write code for you. Show some effort next time please –  Eonasdan Feb 7 '12 at 16:45
    
My apology here, because I am an outsider to CSS. Looks formidable to master its various effects. :-( –  Qiang Xu Feb 7 '12 at 17:29

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

use float:left on the forms.

HTML:

<form>Form A</form>
<form>Form B</form>

CSS:

form
{
    float:left;
}
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Thanks, Caleb. Just curious that what "float:right" will do? –  Qiang Xu Feb 7 '12 at 17:18
2  
It will do the same but it will align on the right side of it's parent. –  Caleb Doucet Feb 7 '12 at 17:34
    
Thank you, Caleb! It seems the horizontal alignment is blocked by some previous html formatting. In the process figuring out what it is. If a former element has a style of "clear:both", will it block the later forms' alignment? Any hint here? Many thanks! –  Qiang Xu Feb 7 '12 at 17:47
1  
clear:both will make anything that is set to float left or float right on the sides of this element to drop below it vertically. If you don't want anything beside your "cleared" element then leave it clear: both but if you want the forms to float beside it set it to clear: none. –  Caleb Doucet Feb 7 '12 at 17:51

Float the forms left inside their parent control. You may also need to set a suitable width to get the layout right on different browsers, depending on margins and padding etc.

HTML:

<form class="colform">Form A</form>
<form class="colform">Form B</form>

CSS:

.colform { float:left; width:50%;}
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Thanks, Ian. But I may haven't stated clear my problem. It seems your css style is blocked by the list element. That is, std::string simplelist = "<li>" + ... + "</li> + "<form class="colform">Form A</form>" + <form class="colform">Form B</form>". But the output forms are still aligned vertically. –  Qiang Xu Feb 7 '12 at 17:20
    
No, it is not blocked by the list html tag, but by some previous formatting. Trying to figure out what is blocking the horizontal alignment of the forms. Hmmm....... –  Qiang Xu Feb 7 '12 at 17:37

You can place each form within a div. Once you have the 2 divs, use css to make narrow and float them to the left to place them one beside each other. You can also add these classes to the form instead of the div. ie:

<div class="form_wrapper">
    <form></form>
</div>
<div class="form_wrapper">
    <form></form>
</div>

OR:

<form class="form_wrapper"></form>
<form class="form_wrapper"></form>

Your CSS:

<style>
    .form_wrapper {
        width: 200px; /* the width of half of your space or 50% */
        float: left;
    }
</style>

Voila that should do it.

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why on earth would you add an extra div around a form when you can apply the styles to the form itself? –  Eonasdan Feb 7 '12 at 19:33
1  
In case he wanted to use the divs as boxes to add css effects seperate from the form. It also illustrates that this method can be used for any HTML object such as a div or a p tag. I also placed the version for having it directly on the form. No need for the rude comment. –  Karl Feb 8 '12 at 4:01
    
the idea here would be to help people learn best practices and teach them a better way of what they're doing. I just think your first example will make novices think that you have to wrap a form in a div to accomplish this. A form is already a block element and therefor a div is not necessary –  Eonasdan Feb 10 '12 at 14:01

There are a number of lightweight CSS frameworks that take the pain out of horizontal styling of page elements like you desire. These frameworks will take care of handling different browser nuances and let you focus on coding instead of layout:

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form { 
width:50%;
float:left;
}
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Or, maybe like this(for proper spacing, on any screen size):

form { 
    width:35%;
    float:left;
    padding-left:5%;
    padding-right:10%;
}
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