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I have two tables.

Table A

+----+-------+--------+-------+-------+
| ID | First | Middle | Last  | Time  |
+----+-------+--------+-------+-------+
| 1  | John  | Alan   | Smith | 12:38 |
+----+-------+--------+-------+-------+
| 2  | John  | Alan   | Smith | 1:24  |
+----+-------+--------+-------+-------+
| 3  | John  | Alan   | Bauer | 1:24  |
+----+-------+--------+-------+-------+
| 4  | Sam   | Paul   | West  | 10:04 |
+----+-------+--------+-------+-------+

Table B

+----+
| ID |
+----+
| 2  |
+----+
| 4  |
+----+

From this, I need to create a SELECT query to get the rows of Table A with First, Middle and Last values that match the First, Middle and Last values for the IDs in Table B.

In other words, I need to get

Table C

+----+-------+--------+-------+-------+
| ID | First | Middle | Last  | Time  |
+----+-------+--------+-------+-------+
| 1  | John  | Alan   | Smith | 12:38 |
+----+-------+--------+-------+-------+
| 2  | John  | Alan   | Smith | 1:24  |
+----+-------+--------+-------+-------+
| 4  | Sam   | Paul   | West  | 10:04 |
+----+-------+--------+-------+-------+

So we selected row 2 and row 4, since they were in Table B, but we also selected row 1 because its First, Middle and Last values matched those in row 2.

We didn't select row 3 because its Last value wasn't in any of the rows from Table B.

I hope this makes sense. I'm not sure how to go about this. I was thinking about using a FULL OUTER JOIN on A and B, but then I wasn't sure how to select the similar rows from there.

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1  
can you please tell me how did you draw your data so nicely? in the ascii table thing? –  IIIIIllllllllIlllllIIIIIIIIlll Feb 7 '12 at 17:40
1  
@I__ - Mark it as code to get the fixed-width font when it's displayed. –  MatBailie Feb 7 '12 at 17:43
1  
@root45, Most of the answers here use subqueries or full joins, both of which are slower than left joins. See my answer for how to do this using only left joins, should be more efficient than the posted alternatives. –  Ben Lee Feb 7 '12 at 17:43
    
@Dems i dont know if that's the case. if so, then it would have taken him like an hour to post the question –  IIIIIllllllllIlllllIIIIIIIIlll Feb 7 '12 at 17:49
2  
@I__ Sorry for the delay in response. Dems is correct, I did do this by hand and it took me some time (although not an hour, maybe 5 or 10 minutes). Ben is also correct that MySQL will output tables like this, so you could quickly create sample tables and copy the output. I'm using SQL Server though, and it was quicker to do this. –  Kris Harper Feb 7 '12 at 18:23

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This should do the trick:

select A.* from TableA A
inner join TableA A2 on A.First = A2.First and A.Middle = A2.Middle and A.Last = A2.Last
and A2.ID in (select ID from TableB)
share|improve this answer

Try:

select *
from TableA a
where exists
(select null
 from TableA a1
 join TableB b on a1.ID = b.ID
 where a.First = a1.First and a.Middle = a1.Middle and a.Last = a1.Last)
share|improve this answer
1  
I think you forgot the word 'Inner' before the word 'Join' –  CodeThug Feb 7 '12 at 17:47
1  
@TimLarson: Without a qualifier, joins default to inner joins. So no, I didn't forget. :) –  Mark Bannister Feb 7 '12 at 18:03
1  
@MarkBannister, you're right of course, but I'd argue it's a best practice to specify "INNER" anyway, just to make it explicit for people reading the code who may not be aware of the default. –  Ben Lee Feb 7 '12 at 18:16

No need to use full inner joins or sub-queries. A table alias and two left joins will do this for you, and I believe this is more efficient than any of the other posted alternatives. See here for proof this works: http://sqlfiddle.com/#!2/11361/1

SELECT c.*
FROM b
LEFT JOIN a ON b.id = a.id
LEFT JOIN a AS c ON
  c.first = a.first AND
  c.middle = a.middle AND
  c.last = a.last

This is actually constructing something very much like the table c you are looking for and the selecting all the rows from it (SELECT c.*).

And it follows the same logic as the way you think about it:

  • Start with the ids from table b (FROM b).
  • Look for the corresponding rows in table a (LEFT JOIN a ON b.id = a.id).
  • Finally, select all rows from table a that also match (LEFT JOIN a AS c ON c.first = a.first AND c.middle = a.middle AND c.last = a.last).
  • That's it, you now have a table c that looks just like what you want.
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1  
This will return only the IDs (from table B). He wanted several fields returned. –  CodeThug Feb 7 '12 at 17:48
    
@TimLarson, no it will return exactly what he posted as what he wants. Note I am selecting c.*, not anything from b. –  Ben Lee Feb 7 '12 at 17:50
1  
@TimLarson, Proof this works: sqlfiddle.com/#!2/11361/1 –  Ben Lee Feb 7 '12 at 17:54
    
Oops, my mistake.... SQLFiddle, now that's cool! I'll have to check that out. –  CodeThug Feb 7 '12 at 18:09
    
@TimLarson, yeah I just discovered it yesterday. Love it! –  Ben Lee Feb 7 '12 at 18:10
SELECT A2.ID, A2.First, A2.Middle, A2.Last, A2.Time
FROM A AS A
INNER JOIN B AS B ON A.ID = B.ID
INNER JOIN A AS A2 ON
    A.First = A2.First AND
    A.Middle = A2.Middle AND
    A.Last = A2.Last
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for best readability. –  Nick Vaccaro Feb 7 '12 at 17:53

Try this:

SELECT    TA2.ID,
          TA2.First,
          TA2.Middle,
          TA2.Last,
          TA2.Time
FROM      TableA AS TA INNER JOIN
          TableB AS TB ON TB.ID = TA.ID LEFT JOIN
          TableA AS TA2 ON TA2.First = TA.First AND
              TA2.Middle = TA.Middle AND
              TA2.Last = TA.Last
share|improve this answer
2  
There is no TB2 defined anywhere –  CodeThug Feb 7 '12 at 17:47
    
I'm sorry, I've corrected the code. –  pistipanko Feb 7 '12 at 20:26

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